This map gets you to the Jesse James family ancestral lands

Here’s a map, crucial to identifying the early settlement in Kentucky of John M. James, following the American Revolution and his entry into the Western frontier.

What this map reconstructs is some original military land grants distributed by Virginia to participants who served in the American Revolution. Virginia set aside these lands about 1783 and began to be dispense them about 1790. John M. James was among the first of the Kentucky pioneers to acquire land here. In his lifetime, John leased, owned, sold, and controlled most all of the land on this map.

The principal grant holder here was Col. Nathaniel Welch, who acquired most everything west of Buck Creek, identified on the right. On another map not shown here, Welch also acquired about 3,500 acres east of Pitman Creek. From the land at Pitman Creek to the land at Buck Creek, most al of it intermittently fell under the control of the James family. These are the lands that formed the foundations of Pulaski County, Kentucky, of which John M. James was a founder.

Looking more closely in the upper center, Fellowship Knob identifies the first acquisition by John M. James.  Following the road, upper center of Fellowship Knob, takes you to the site of John’s Flat Lick Baptist Church, founded in 1799, and still operational today. John’s land extended further, well beyond the top boundary of this map to adjoin the military grant of Robert McAlister, another family relation.

Flat Lick Baptist Church, founded 1799

From Fellowship Knob on the road extending to the lower left is a black square identifying the Mansion House of John M. James, built sometime in the1790s.

Mansion House of John M. James

Proceeding from the Mansion House around the corner and downward brings you to the intersection of Dahl Road & Shopville Road at Flat Lick Creek. The black square here identifies the stone house of the “talented, but erratic” Rev. Joseph Martin James.

The Stone House of Rev. Joseph Martin James

The open space below Shopville is the big Flat Lick, still in the possession of James descendants today. A buffalo trail originally came down the center of this map from Crab Orchard to Flat Lick, where the buffalo then, and still do today, gorge themselves on its abundant salts, adjacent to Flat Lick Creek.

This map is part of a recent two-volume history Dawning of the Cumberland by Charlene Adkins who is 93 years old. The old military surveys were drafted by surveyor Bobby Hudson, and identified by D. E. Coates, a Pulaski County historian. Their work has proved critical in putting the James family lore about John M. James’ lands into clearer perspective, while adding definition that is plainly identifiable today.

This map arrives just in time for the publication of Volume II of Jesse James Soul Liberty, This Bloody Gound, which tells the story  of the first arrival and settlement on the Western frontier of Frank and Jesse James’ grandfather, following the service of all of these patriots and first military grant holders after the American Revolution.


Count me in!

I’m in! This morning I sent my literary submission for the Penned 2014 – 7th Annual Writer’s Showcase to Kentucky Monthly magazine.

The piece was finished a couple weeks ago. It’s been fermenting since. I checked my creative non-fiction entry this morning, and it hadn’t gone stinky on me since I wrote it. Creative writing can do that, a lot. In fact, the work was smelling so sweet, I decided now’s the time to get it in, well before deadline.

Kentucky offers some of the stiffest writing competition outside of New York. Kentucky writers, like Kentucky Derby contenders, know this is the place to compete and be judged. Watch for the results in October.

 


Still WANTED…Francis Lawrence “Jimmy” Keating

For those who read about Jimmy Keating on page 196 in Volume I of Jesse James Soul Liberty, here’ s some supplemental information. The first is the fingerprint card for Francis Lawrence “Jimmy” Keating from Leavenworth Prison where he was incarcerated, following his train robbery with Jimmy Holden. The second is Keating’s FBI WANTED bulletin, issued by J. Edgar Hoover following Keating’s escape from Leavenworth Prison.

Jimmy Keating is still a wanted man. I continue to research for new information about him. For years, I’ve been trying to learn more about his Keating genealogy. In recent weeks, I was contacted by one of his cousins and have been able to expand my knowledge about this silent and elusive criminal, who by chance became related to the James family. As the James-Keating family cousins were unaware of the cousin who contacted me, the contact cousin was also un-knowledgeable about his James-Keating cousins. I don’t foresee a family reunion in their futures, however.

I have enough material to write a book about Frances L. Keating, but my accumulated research is far from complete to tell Keating’s entire story. Presently in particular, I’ve been looking for information about one of Keating’s brothers, Robert “Bob” Keating, who died in Kansas City, according to a letter Jimmy Keating wrote when he learned in prison about his brother’s passing while reading the Kansas City Star.

From the documentation I have in hand, it’s clear Keating had outside support, both in the political community and among organized labor. Keating’s retirement was spent as president of a boilermaker’s local. I don’t believe more information about Keating will lead to where Jimmy Hoffa is buried. I don’t care about that. I do believe, though, from an historical point of view that James L. Keating was as interesting an outlaw as Jesse James.

One noticeable difference between Francis Keating and Jesse James is that Keating had the superior penmanship, and he could spell correctly. That’s the difference between graduating 8th grade and being home schooled.


AUCTION ALERT – Fake Frank & Jesse James Image

The claimed authenticity of an auction item today can fall under very critical, and perhaps more professional, analysis. Technology itself and the internet, now truly being world-wide, have brought a host of analytical skills to bear. No longer can a claim be made that an item is what it’s claimed to be. Of course, a claim can still be made, but people of serious intent want to know the underlying facts for the claim – particularly if you expect to reap a windfall of $40,000 to $60,ooo for a simple photographic image.

You’d think auction houses would have become aware of this by now. But they seem to be the last to get the message.

J. Levine Auction & Appraisal in Scottsdale, Arizona, has an image it claims is that of Frank & Jesse James. The auction house expects to sell the image at auction on July 21, 2014. The image, the auction house claims, has been in the possession of Edward Ziebarth and family for over 100 years, implying the image came into the family’s possession about the time Frank James died. Just how that occurred and under what circumstances are not stated. It is implied the image had been displayed at the Ziebarth Family Museum in Adams County, Nebraska.

To help a prospective purchaser believe in the claim of the auction house, auctioneer Josh Levine has posted the following two videos. The videos are vaguely reminiscent of the old familiar con game of a pea placed under three cups. The videos are intended, not to provide any substantive information, but instead to trick the eye.

 

 


 

 

If the image is authentic as its owner and auction house claim and is, in fact, worth as much money as they expect someone to pay, it would seem the wise course of action would have been to spend $5,000 to subject the image to formal forensic analysis, and provide the forensic report as evidence of authenticity. As it is, prospective bidders are expected to bring only lots of cash and lots of ignorance.

In my estimation, the auction image is not what it’s claimed to be.

I see nothing in this image, or in the countless images from the James family files, that resembles these two individuals, or that produces a physical similarity with Frank & Jesse James, or any other member of their family.

Jesse James at age 14

Without executing any mathematical analysis of the images, or going further into sub-strata flesh analysis, or anything more, a simple comparison test should have sufficed.

The auction house claims its image for auction was taken before Frank entered Confederate service, placing Jesse at about age 15. The image of Jesse that should have been employed for comparison should have been the image of Jesse at age 14. It doesn’t take an expert then to perceive the difference between the authentic image and the fake one. Instead, what the auction house has done is to compare one fake image of Jesse James to another fake image of Jesse James. That, if purposeful, would amount to fraud.
 
ERIC F. JAMES
 


Jesse James – Your Guide to Child Care & Parenting

Who knew Jesse James would be a guide for child care and parenting? Somebody thinks so. But who that somebody is remains to be discovered.

An alert from Amanda Palmer, a performance artist I like and follow, said she had just sent off her finished book manuscript for publication. She invited me to her book’s pre-order page at Powell’s Books. While there, I checked out how my own book appeared on Powell’s website.

What a surprise! There was Jesse James Soul Liberty listed under the category of “Child Care & Parenting.”  Who knew?

Child care and parenting also appears to cost more. The book is listed at a two dollar premium above the suggested retail price.

In writing and proofing the book, I read the book so many times; but never did I come away from the book with that perspective. This clearly informs me that Jesse James means much more in American culture than anyone ever knew. The boy continues to confound expectation.


Surprise Discovery for a Contributor to Jesse James Soul Liberty

UPDATED SOURCE CITATION…In the past few days I reconnected with Barbara Wenzel-Clemens, now age 81. It was several years ago when Barbara first contacted me to inform me she had been a high school classmate of Diane and Don Baumel, great grandchildren of Jesse James. Some of the information Barbara provided at the time now appears on page 288 of Jesse James Soul Liberty, V.I.

What doesn’t appear in my book is my citation of Barbara as being the source of the information, which I now acknowledge here. Barbara wasn’t identified because her identity got locked up in that pesky external hard drive of mine you’ve heard me mention before, that got damaged when a light fell on it after a TV interview. The cost of retrieving the hard drive’s information has been cost prohibitive since. I was happy to apologize to Barbara in recent days for the neglect. When JJSL next appears in a revised edition, I assured her, she will be acknowledged properly in the book.

Then Barbara and I got to talking about her own family ancestry and a couple of surprises in store for her. The slim genealogy that Barbara gave me before, and what I was able to add to it since, already appears in our SURNAMES database on Stray Leaves. With her contact info locked up, I never could tell Barbara about it in the past. This week, I did.

My research into Barbara’s past showed that she is a 4th great granddaughter of Daniel Boone, just like her classmates, Diane and Don Baumel, were 5th great grandchildren of the famed explorer.

The surprise here for Barbara is that their shared relationship to Boone also makes cousins of all three of the former classmates. It also makes Barbara a cousin to Jesse James.

If that isn’t enough, when I last worked on her husband’s familiar family name of Clemens, there was an additional discovery.

I informed Barbara last week about Jeremiah Clemens who appears on page 84 of JJSL. Joseph McAlister James purchased the Clemens hotel that was built in Danville, Kentucky, as the Black Horse Inn. When the hotel burned, Joseph McJames rebuilt it in brick. Jeremiah Clemens, I told Barbara, is a cousin of her husband. Not only that, her husband is a cousin of Samuel Langhorne Clemens, aka Mark Twain.

Barbara assured me she was going to look into all that, and what I said certainly explained some stories that circulated among her family in the past.

I told her I could save her the time. I directed Barbara to the SURNAMES database on Stray Leaves first. Then I sent her ancestral reports for both her and her husband, which can be downloaded HERE for her husband and HERE for her.

Rounding out almost two decades of research, I can cite numerous stories like Barbara’s. The surprise of discovery is always thrilling. And no matter how old Barbara may be, I know she’ll be looking at her past with a richness never fully grasped when she was living it.

 


James-Younger Gang Past President Deceased

Janet H. Goodman, long-time James-Younger Gang member, died suddenly on June 30, 2013 at her home in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Janet was 73 at the time of her death.

Jan Goodman, days before her passing

Jan was a native of Minneapolis and was preceded in death by her parents, Julius and Lucile Nielsen, brother, Julius Jr. and close friend Jack Koblas. She is survived by her three children, Bret, Troy (Annette) Goodman, and Holly (Lannie) Segebarth. Also by three grandchildren, Avery, Davis and Vaughn, and a sister, Joan Nims. Memorial services were held Monday, July 7 at the Washburn-McReavy Funeral Home.

Janet worked for thirty years at the Fairview University Hospital in the accounts receivable department. She was also active in a number of fundraising activities at the hospital. She retired in 2006. She developed an interest in the James-Younger Gang when she went to a book signing by Jesse James book author Jack Koblas. Janet and Jack were high school classmates and she soon became Jack’s publicist. Jack suffered from Parkinson’s disease for the last decade of his life and Janet often drove him to his book signings. Speaking engagements, and other activities connected with his writing. She also often assisted in getting him to medical appointments and with other aspects of his medical care.

Jan Goodman with author John Koblas

Janet became one of the movers and shakers in the James-Younger Gang organization. She was a lady who always knew how to get things done. From 2006 to 2010 she served as the secretary and treasurer, and from 2012 to 2013 as the president of the organization. Janet was a selfless and caring person , she will be sadly missed by family and many, many friends.


Roy Rogers, a Cousin of Jesse James

Did you know the cowboy singer Roy Rogers is a cousin of Jesse James?

You can download the ancestry & kinship of Leonard Slye, aka Roy Rogers, HERE.

 


In Defense of a Birther

Singer Pat Boone’s recent birther claim has turned on him. Against all evidence, Boone has claimed he will produce proof that President Barrack Obama was born in Kenya. Boone, it appears, now is called upon to produce evidence that he himself is a descendant of Daniel Boone, as he claims. The challenge for Boone is to produce bona fide proof of ancestry connecting him to Kentucky explorer Daniel Boone, or fall suspect that his own perma-dark complexion indicates that Pat Boone also may be foreign born.

Los Angelinos recall Pat Boone in his semi-retirement during the 1970’s. Boone was a periodic guest on the daytime television show of former L.A. mayor Sam Yorty.

Sam Yorty & Ronald Reagan

The mayor, an arch Republican like Pat Boone, was proudly tickled any time Boone claimed to be descended from the famed frontier woodsman Daniel Boone, which Pat Boone did fairly regularly.

Yorty was fond of associations like that. He eagerly friended many of Hollywood’s celluloid products. Favorites were California Senator and actor George Murphy and actor and later Governor Ronald Reagan.

George Murphy, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly

Evelle J. Younger

 

Yorty also was a Republican Party associate of Evelle J. Younger, whom Yorty assisted in electing as California State Attorney General, following Younger’s service under Yorty as Los Angeles County District Attorney.

Younger never claimed his kinship with the Younger brothers of the James-Younger Gang. Had Yorty known of it, everyone else might have known it. Yorty was a master promoter.

 

Presently, internet challenges claim Pat Boone is NOT a descendant of Daniel Boone. Like birthers, however, the faux genealogists making such claims can only point to error laden internet databases to support their charge.  It is doubtful any of the genealogy bloggers has ever smelled a musty public records book, or have descended into any dank, dimly lit courthouse basement to conduct physical research of their own.

Here at Stray Leaves, Charles Eugene Patrick Boone’s genealogy and link to Daniel Boone is accepted, as is the word of Pat Boone, until proven any different. This acceptance has withstood publication for 15 years or more, leaving ample room for any disproof to appear in that time. Despite America’s rampant enthusiasm for genealogy, and especially celebrity genealogy, no proof has surfaced.

Who’s to say, though, if genealogists approached Pat Boone’s ancestry from a political perspective? Having been born in Florida a descendant of Daniel Boone may not be acceptable to some beliefs. A more desirable attitude would be to discredit Pat Boone, his ancestry, and his birthroot. He’s not a descendant of Daniel Boone at all. His perma-complexion indicates Pat Boone is the native of a foreign Caribbean country instead, and Pat Boone’s U.S. citizenship should be under consideration as revocable, together with his recording royalties. Stray Leaves eschews such unethical genealogy practice, as it also eschews the birtherism practiced by Pat Boone among others.

In the practice of genealogy, birtherism holds no place. One’s family claim is respected until proved otherwise by reputable research. When disproved, the genealogy stands corrected.

The only defense of birtherism among genealogists is to be factual, prove your own, and produce the proof of those you claim is false. Ante up your own factual record first, Pat Boone, before attacking others.

 

 


Literally…The Latest James Family Dirt

“You want to see our new tombstone?” Barbara Lemaster James proudly invited me. The question echoed like a question from long ago, “You want to watch our home movies?” Back then, no one ever wanted to watch anyone’s home movies, let alone inspect their pre-bought tombstone before they died.

Already I was biting my tongue, thinking of a million jokes. I restrained myself, though, severely reminding myself that I am the genealogist and historian in the family. There might be implications here I may need to know. Get serious, Eric. “Of course,” I replied. “Let’s go.”

Raymond Edward James displays his family story in Jesse James Soul Liberty, Vol. I, Behind the Family Wall of Stigma & Silence

Barbara’s husband, Raymond Edward James, had a rough time this past year.

Cousin, Mark New, who’s a funeral director, suggested they select a plot among their James cousins, now buried at Mt. Zion Cemetery in Science Hill, Kentucky. Mark also maintains the expanding cemetery that once was part of his Grandmother Adams’ family farm.

When we all gathered at our annual family outing over the weekend, Barbara issued me her invitation.

I could have guessed some irrepressible James family dark humor would cut loose.

Raymond & Barbara LeMaster James

With Mark’s guidance, Raymond and Barbara had put some considerable thought into their selection. Unlike the plentiful black tombstones, which I found among numerous James all across the country, Raymond and Barbara selected a Confederate gray with dignified black engraving. Around two wedding rings linking their separate burial locations, they engraved their wedding date.

Each side was flanked by a receptacle. “What goes in there,” I asked.

“Yellow roses in mine,” Barbara quickly replied.

“And in Raymond’s?”

“Ice cream,” Raymond interjected. Ice cream, it is, I noted.

On the backside of their tombstone, Barbara and Raymond thoughtfully had engraved the names of their children, even those of Barbara’s by her prior marriage.

“See,” Raymond pointed. “There’s the genealogy. Right there.” Raymond looked for my reaction. “Well, Eric, you’re not going to be around here forever!” he added.

Any sense of decorum, if any existed at all, now was broken. “Have you both lied down here before,” I asked. “There doesn’t seem to be enough length.”

Barbara snapped, “Oh yeah. We fit.”

Then came Barbara’s zinger. “And look, Eric. You can have this space, right next door.” I was stunned. Literally, stunned. To encourage me further, Barbara tried closing the deal. “And there’s room further down the row, for all your Facebook friends.”

 

 

We paraded around the tombstones of the other James family buried there. Ivadean James caught my eye. The one and only time I met and talked with her was about a year before she died.

Ivadean never knew what happened to her father, Mack Henry James. He abandoned her family when she was a child. But Ivadean did get to know what happened to Mack before I did. My research found him about a year after Ivadean died, too late to tell her myself, except to share our mutual discovery in prayer.

For the first time, I noted, too, that Ivadean’s estranged husband, Gid Elliott, had died the day after she died, but in a different hospital. Things like that leave you wanting to know a story never told.

Tombstone of Gid & Ivadean James Elliott

“Tombstones are important,” I said. They are good places to visit, and the best places to tell stories. No one seems to hold back when standing before a tombstone.

“What do you want on your tombstone,” Raymond’s daughter asked me.

“Easy,” I answered. “I want an electronic chip embedded in my stone. You dial a radio frequency and you can hear me personally greet you. “Hi, how are you? Nice of you to drop by. Did I ever tell you the story about…?”

“Yeah,” Raymond’s daughter shouted enthusiastically. “Let’s party!” I was assured I’d have my chip, on the condition I signed up for a party plot.

When we returned to the farmhouse, Mark had the tractor fired up with the hay wagon hitched behind. Every year, Mark drives a hayride full of kids up to the cemetery hill. They visit with their dead relatives, and tell stories.

Back at our table, I asked, “Is this one of those things where, if you get two others to sign up for a plot, you get your plot for free?” With that, we were off and running.

“Look at Mark,” someone said. “Come on, kids. Sign up now. Those old folks back there got theirs. You saw them come back. They’re trying to get others into yours.” From there, the jokes ran on and on.

I still expect to see Raymond and Barbara at next year’s annual gathering. And God forbid, if not…we’ll bring yellow roses, or ice cream, and plenty of stories.


Family Relationships Explained

The greats & grands…the nibblings, inbetweeners, and zero cousins…and, lest we forget their countless numbers, the most pesky ones of all – the removed.

Do you know what to call all those people in your family tree?


 

No one really can explain what a 4th cousin, 3 times removed means. Have you ever met anyone who can? But this video does. Watch it, and you can explain it, too!

Once you view this video, you will become the life of any family dinner, party, get-together, or family reunion.

Go ahead. Call your brother or sister your zero cousin. See what happens. Your knowledge will blow their mind. Introduce a family nibbling to a family inbetweener. You’ll start an instant conversation, no beer or wine required. Demonstrate your mind boggling knowledge and expertise for everyone you know with your ability to explain what a 4th cousin, 3 times removed is. Your family and friends will be stunned and amazed that you didn’t even need a powerpoint presentation.

Here’s a handy crib sheet to keep in your wallet or purse.


 

*** A BONUS FAMILY RELATIONSHIP ***

– ONLY FOUND HERE -

Now here’s a little secret of my own. Most genealogists don’t even know about this.

Instead of allowing your divorce to turn you into a rude person, always referring to your divorced husband or wife crudely as your “ex,” why not continue to treasure the love who left you behind for another? After all, we’re just talking a mild adjustment in legal semantics.

First, refer to your “ex” as your “former” spouse instead. That will keep you on a good footing. Now you can embrace the person who married them as your “husband-in-law” or “wife-in-law” !!!

You’ll not only expand your family, you’ll never again have to suffer the loss of family that divorce inflicts. Try it. You’ll like it.

 


The Lost Cause: The Trials of Frank and Jesse James

BOOK REVIEW: Muehlberger, James P. The Lost Cause: The Trials of Frank and Jesse James (Westholme Publishing, LLC, 2013) 255 pp. index, timeline, bibliography, endnotes, some photos, illustrations and maps, hardcover $18.96.

The author begins the book with a Prologue where he expounds on the “myth of The Lost Cause.” He seems to believe that the only cause of the Civil War was slavery. There were quite a number of other causes and many of them had to do with economics.

One of the main themes of the book is the Gallatin, Missouri bank robbery. He makes a fair case that this may have been a planned assassination and not a bank robbery at all. Jesse James and maybe Jim Anderson set out to kill Major Samuel Cox who killed Bloody Bill Anderson during the war. However, Captain John Sheets, who looked much like Cox, was killed instead. The author does not believe Frank was involved in this event at all.

The author makes much of the suit that was filed against the James boys after the Gallatin affair. The attorney who filed the suit was Henry Clay McDougal. He represented Daniel Smoote, whose horse had been taken by the fleeing gunmen. Smoote won the suit and as settlement was awarded the horse that had been left behind the by the supposed Frank and Jesse James. The author relies on McDougal’s book, Recollections: 1844-1909, for much of what he says about the suit and the aftermath. Throughout the book McDougal is on a real ego trip and much of what he says is open to question. McDougal says he was working with Samuel Hardwicke, a Clay County attorney, and the Pinkerton Detective Agency as early as 1869. However, all the evidence that this reviewer has been able to locate shows that the Pinkertons did not become involved in trying to catch the James boys until after the Corydon, Iowa bank robbery in 1871. Further, Samuel Hardwicke did not begin to work with the Pinkertons until the spring of 1874. McDougal claimed that Jesse James tried to kill him twice because of his involvement in the law suit. This claim is not supported by any other evidence that this reviewer has been able to find. We have only McDougal’s word for this.

There are any number of inaccuracies in the book. Several names are incorrect. Union General James Blunt is identified as Jones Blunt. Sheriff James Timberlake is identified as Henry Timberlake. One of Frank James’ key attorneys during his trial at Gallatin in 1883 is first identified as John F. Philips then suddenly he becomes Thomas Philips. The author says Susan James and Allen Parmer married in Kentucky instead of in Clay County, Missouri. Archie Samuel’s age is given as thirteen when the Pinkertons bombed the James-Samuel home in 1875. He was actually not yet nine years old when he was killed. Zerelda Samuel’s age is given as fifty-five at the time of Frank’s trial when she was really fifty-eight. The date of Frank James’ surrender to Missouri Governor Crittenden is stated as October 5th 1881 instead of 1882.

There are also a number of omissions that seem odd. For example, the hanging of Dr. Samuel by Union troops is discussed but the severe beating the same troops gave Jesse James is not mentioned. One of the key attorneys in Frank James’ trial in Alabama is never mentioned either. He was Robert W. Walker, a graduate of Princeton and Columbia University Law School and a former member of the Alabama Supreme Court.

In summary, this book adds little to the knowledge of the James-Younger gang and it contains a lot of misinformation.

- Nancy B. Samuelson


Beta Readers Wanted !

BETA READERS WANTED to preview and critique Volume II of the Jesse James Soul Liberty quintet. The book is a non-fiction, narrative, historical biography with copious endnotes. Previous knowledge of Jesse James or his family is beneficial, but not required.

This Bloody Ground continues the epic saga of the Jesse James family begun in Volume I, Behind the Family Wall of Stigma & Silence.

Volume II introduces for the first time the history of John M. James, the outlaw’s grandfather. From John’s service in the American Revolution when John first associates with the great grandfather of the Younger Gang, to John’s engagement with a band of rebel Baptist preachers who barter disobedience to the Crown and patriotic allegiance for the separation of church and state, ending in their exile from Virginia into the wilderness of Kentucky in a Traveling Church, John learns the lessons of conflict, confrontation, and nonconformity that his progeny will inherit.

On America’s first frontier, John struggles against the ever-present violence with Native people to create settlement communities and a safe home for his fraying family. He is witness to land grabbing predators, Kentucky’s separation movement, and the treachery and intrigues of “The Spanish Conspiracy.” He associates with the forebears of the Jesse James in-law families, as well as with ancestors of Quantrill Guerillas. Doggedly, he struggles to settle the land, create commerce, and to provide the government and social institutions necessary for self-determination. All that, and nationhood itself, becomes threatened by the War of 1812. John’s fellow bands of rebel preachers, now graying, wobble to war for their final conflict, as John dispatches his son and extended family. Fearing his impending demise, John prays, “God, give me more time!” He is dedicated to one more revolution – against government’s victimization of its citizens through financial manipulation. This time, against banks!

My only request is that you commit to reading the entire book or chapters given you, and to provide substantive criticism, analysis, or commentary. Preference will be given to those who have read Volume I of JJSL.

The chapters will be provided to you in your choice of pdf or doc format. You will receive two parts of the book initially, with the final third part only after notification that you’ve read the first two. The length of the book is no more than 500 pages, which includes roughly 100 pages of citations and notes. The time period for your completion and commentary is 90 days.

Please email me if you are interested. ericjames@ericjames.org


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