Chasing Frank and Jesse James: The Bungled Northfield Bank Robbery and the Long Manhunt

BOOK REVIEW: Fanebust, Wayne; Chasing Frank and Jesse James: The Bungled Northfield Bank Robbery and the Long Manhunt

(Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, Inc., 2018) pp.v-238, illustrations, notes, bibliography, index, ISBN 978-1-4766-7067-6, paperback, $35.00

By Nancy B. Samuelson

This is another rehash of the Northfield Bank Robbery and the escape of Frank and Jesse James. The author used several creditable sources for the book, but he also used a lot of newspaper articles as sources. The newspapers are often from areas far removed both geographically and in time from the crimes which they described. It stretches the imagination to believe newspapers from Vermont or Florida forty years after the incident would be considered as accurate sources.

The author repeats many of the more garish tales about the James and Younger gang members and often says that what he repeats is probably just a story. For example the tale of Cole Younger checking out his new Enfield rifle. Cole supposedly lined up fifteen Kansas Jayhawkers and kept shooting until he killed them all. Competent historians have long dismissed this story as a complete myth.

Author Wayne Fanebust

The author repeatedly proves that his knowledge about the state of Missouri is not very comprehensive. He makes the statement that Missouri was a slave state with most slaves in the southern part of the state. In fact, most of the slaves in Missouri were along the Missouri River in the area often referred to as “Little Dixie.” When Jesse James is living in St. Joseph, Missouri, the author states he was living there in the “Cracker Neck District”. The Cracker Neck area was located in Jackson County, near Independence, Missouri, not in St. Joseph.

Jesse James is made out to be a most brutal man. He reportedly shot and killed a “St. Louis drummer” who was just walking down the street out of pure wantonness.  Jesse was also a real ladies man and had liaisons with hundreds of women. He supposedly had a daughter living in Howard County, Missouri at the time of his death. And Jesse also killed Ed Miller because Miller caught Jesse fooling around with his girlfriend. Ed Miller was a married man, but I guess he might have had a girlfriend too.

Bill Anderson’s men always rode under the Black Flag. And when Anderson’s men killed Major Johnson and his troops during the Centralia raid, they shot Johnson and all 148 men in the head.

Two new members of the James gang are revealed in this book, Sam Kaufman, and Sam Hill. None of the most reliable books about the James gang every mentions these two names. This author also claims the notorious liar, Kit Dalton, is a friend of Jesse James. This is very unlikely although Kit Dalton did know Frank James in later years.

This book has little to recommend it. The book is full of inaccuracies, has misspelled words (deputy marshal is consistently deputy Marshall) and contains some dubious photos. It is very disappointing to see McFarland & Company publishing such a poor quality book at such an outrageous price.

RELATED

The following two books by John J. Koblas, Faithful Until Death and The Jesse James Northfield Raid,  remain the most authoritative accounts of the James-Younger Gang’s robbery of the Northfield Bank.


 

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Tuesday February 18th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Quantrill scout, John Noland, African-American...Our James cousin Ronnie Atnip shows us these photos of two Quantrill reunions. One features Frank James, front and center. The other features John Noland, top right. ... See MoreSee Less

Saturday February 15th, 2020

Stray Leaves

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other. Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.

The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwood's marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.
... See MoreSee Less

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other.  Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.
 
The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie  Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwoods marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.

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John and Dinah were my 7th.great grandparents.

Tuesday February 4th, 2020

Stray Leaves

One hundred years ago, tourists still visited the Black Horse Inn at Nugent Corners in Midway, Ky. where Frank & Jesse James' mother was born. ... See MoreSee Less

One hundred years ago, tourists still visited the Black Horse Inn at Nugent Corners in Midway, Ky. where Frank & Jesse James mother was born.
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