Category Archives: James in the Arts

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Three

history-channel-logo-250x188

DOWNLOAD FOR FREE a deconstruction of Chapter Three taken from the transcript of the History Channel’s program Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure. The file is in .pdf format, and already contains initial commentary.

As the fakery of this broadcast continues to be dissected, it appears others also have taken a dim view of the program.

Other Jesse James interest groups have dismissed the program entirely.

Surprisingly, those who enjoy the recreation of treasure hunting, have lambasted Jesse James’ Hidden Treasures outright.

Members tell us that The James-Younger Gang and the Wild West History Association will be publishing negative reviews shortly.

Given the fact the History Channel has totally given up on broadcasting any legitimate history, in favor of broadcasting entertainment instead, and the entertainment they broadcast can’t even find an audience who appreciates it, the question has to be put to them. Why bother?

RELATED STORIES

The Latest Fake Jesse James History from Ron Pastore

James-Younger Gang Journal Pans Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Bogus History & Fantasy from The History Channel

Jesse James Hidden Treasure: Laughable “science”

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter One

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Two

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Three

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Chapter 4 deconstructed

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Chapter 5 Deconstructed

Newman University Promotes Bogus Jesse James Historian Ron Pastore

Jesse James Family Challenges Newman University’s Presentation of Bogus History

Wichita Man Tries to Change History of Jesse James

Wichita’s Jesse James Museum Challenges Jesse James History as We Know It

Area Historian Takes a Fresh Look at Jesse James

Techniques of Jesse James Con Artists

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Two

jesse james’ hidden treasure

I was appalled with this program on the History Channel. This program presumed to be about Jesse James’ hidden treasure was something that should have been on Looney Tunes, not the History Channel.

This entire program was based on speculation and treasure hunting myths. At no time was there any objective history shown throughout this program.

Why would Jesse James spend time hiding treasure in Kansas?  Kansas and Missouri were at war with each other for some five years before the Civil War started in the East.  People in Missouri, for the most part, hated Kansans.  Why on earth would Jesse do more than pass through that state? There is no data of any kind that places him in Kansas for extended periods of time.

The amount of money that Pastore says the James gang stole is way off base.  In this program I understood him to say 1.5 million but in the transcript of the program it says 5 million.  Both numbers art way too high. Most historians would place the amount as $225,000 to $250,000.

What on earth is the National Geomantic Survey Organization? Geomantic pertains to geomancy which is a form of fortune telling or magic.  It is not science.

Pastore spends a lot of time in caves reading KGC code.  Really! There is no evidence the James gang ever hid out in or camped in caves.  A cave would be a good place to be easily trapped if you were on the run.

Pastore talks about OBSCURE, 19-TH CENTURY ARCHIVES but never tells us names these archives or tells where he found them.  There is a lot of information readily available on the KGC , you don’t need to go to obscure resources.  There are reports of KGC activities in the Official Records of the Civil War,   in the annual reports of the U. S. Attorney Generals Reports, and in various scholarly publications. I suggest Pastore and Ganis spend a little more time in libraries.

There is plenty more I could say about this very bad program.  I hope someone will give the individual at the History Channel responsible for this mess a good spanking!

Nancy B. Samuelson

RELATED STORIES

The Latest Fake Jesse James History from Ron Pastore

James-Younger Gang Journal Pans Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Bogus History & Fantasy from The History Channel

Jesse James Hidden Treasure: Laughable “science”

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter One

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Two

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Deconstructing Chapter Three

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Chapter 4 deconstructed

Jesse James’ Hidden Treasure – Chapter 5 Deconstructed

Newman University Promotes Bogus Jesse James Historian Ron Pastore

Jesse James Family Challenges Newman University’s Presentation of Bogus History

Wichita Man Tries to Change History of Jesse James

Wichita’s Jesse James Museum Challenges Jesse James History as We Know It

Area Historian Takes a Fresh Look at Jesse James

Techniques of Jesse James Con Artists

The James & the Arts

Jesse James by Beth Hoeckel
Jesse James by Beth Hoeckel

 

 

Beth Hoeckel is an artist who graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago, an institution supported by the Jesse James family.

Vassie James, a wife of Hugh Campbell Ward     & cousin of the outlaw, founded the Pembroke School in Kansas City. Among her descendants, Vassie left a strong legacy in the education and the arts.

Vassie’s granddaughter, Joan Olmsted married Dr. James Franklin Oates III of Evanston outside of Chicago. Dr. Oates was a life trustee of Goodman Theater that was affiliated with the Art Institute. The couple also financially support the Virginia Commonwealth University School for the Arts. Joan O. Oates is a life trustee of Collegiate School in Richmond, Virginia.

Vassie’s daughter-in-law, Mary Van Etten married J. Harris Ward, a life trustee of the University of Chicago, where Mary also was a life trustee. Mary served on boards of the Chicago Public Library Foundation, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Council on Foreign Relations, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago, where she served as president of the Women’s Board of Trustees from 1953 to 1966.

Eric James was enrolled at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1966, and performed in a half a dozen plays at its Goodman Theater.

More of Beth Hoeckel’s art can been seen at www.bethhoeckel.com