Historic Photo Fraud Produces a Merchant of Identity Theft

The family of America’s iconic folklore outlaw, Jesse James, considers Justin Whiting of Spalding, England a merchant of identity theft.

Fake image of Jesse James

The James family discredits the claim by Justin Whiting that says this is an image of Jesse James. The family accuses Whiting of trying to capitalize on the authentic identity of Jesse James and the James family. They charge Whiting manufactured, promoted, and is selling an image of Jesse James that is not authentic, but a fake.

Justin Whiting
Justin Whiting in an interview with Simon Spark of the BBC

The family further says Whiting is creating a scam of identity theft to capture a multi-million dollar profit, using the fraudulent image.

An interview of Whiting by Simon Spark from BBC Look North, appearing in Whiting’ s Facebook timeline, confirms that Whiting thinks his fake image is worth $2 million.

Whiting says, he wants to buy a house and car with the proceeds he anticipates.

Simon Spark
Simon Spark of the BBC

James Genetics

The James family maintains the known and authentic physical features of Jesse James are genetic. The  identity theft of known historical physical features that are evident in the past equates to the very same characteristics alive in the James family today. Stealing from Jesse James is theft from his family alive today.

Identifiable characteristics of historical identity continue to exist among living members of the James in present time. As evidence, the James produced two videos – MEN of the Jesse James Family and WOMEN of the Jesse James Family. The videos forcefully display and identify multiple genetic physical features of the James that persist from the first period of photography to present day.

Identity Thief with a Past

Fake image claimed to be Abraham Lincoln
Tintype claimed in 2013  by Justin Whiting to be U.S. President Abraham Lincoln

Justin Whiting first surfaced in public in 2013. At that time, Whiting claimed to have found an unknown image of Abraham Lincoln, the renowned U.S. President.

Whiting’s story of an eBay find of Lincoln that in fact is not Lincoln forged a template that Whiting now repeats five years later with his “7£ eBay find,” which Whiting claims is Jesse James.

The James family declares Whiting’s actions follow a known template for fraud and con artistry. The family affirms it has been impacted numerous times before by experiences of other fraudulent Jesse James photos hawked by other con artists.

A Practiced Habitué of Fraud

image-restore masthead
Masthead of the image-restore website

The story of Whiting’s claimed image of Abraham Lincoln first was published on the web site image-restore. The business generally provides services for restoring old photos.

Ironically, the owner of the company and website resurfaces today regarding Whiting’s fake Jesse James image. More about Neal Rhodes, aka Neal David Rhodes, later.

In 2013, Justin Whiting embraced image-restore to disseminate his Lincoln deceit.

For his Jesse James fraud in 2018, Whiting employed SWNS, a news story generator in the UK.

SWNS –  Collaborator in Storytelling

SWNS website landing page and services descriptor
Landing page blurb on the sWNS website, describing what SWNS does

“Every day we help people tell their story,” SWNS advertises.

As it did for Justin Whiting, SWNS packages the teller’s story and distributes the content to news outlets and aggregators. From the UK’s newspaper The Telegraph to quickie, spot video delivery outlets like YouTube, SWNS spread Whiting’s scam.

The income SWNS collects is shared with its storyteller. By simply manufacturing a story, Justin Whiting already is profiting off his fake Jesse James image swindle.

The Template of His Con

A look in the mirror at Whiting’s 2013 Lincoln image fraud reveals the template for a fraud that Whiting transfers in 2018 to his claimed Jesse James tintype.

Whiting’s template employs the following elements:

  • An attention-grabbing headline of a discovery
  • Story of the discovery made on eBay
  • A comparison of the discovered image with an authentic image
  • Reputable authority consulted
  • Authoritative rejection
  • Experts of convenience substituted
  • Report & promotion publicly generated

The following excerpts from image-restore define Whiting’s template elements in 2013.

Discovery Headline

eBay Find

Comparison Images

Fake Abraham Lincoln compared to an autehtic Abraham Lincoln.
Identity theft example comparing a fraudulent image of Abraham Lincoln to an authentic image of Lincoln. The fraudulent image showing indications of being “doctored.”

Reputable Authority Produces Rejection

Experts of Convenience

Public Report & Promotion

Image of unknown man altered and restored by Neal Rhodes
Altered image of an unknown man restored by Neal Rhodes, claimed by Justin Whiting to be Jesse James

The author of Justin Whiting’s Lincoln claim story is Neal Rhodes, aka Neal David Rhodes, pictured in the “About the Author” excerpt above.

Rhodes resurfaces in Whiting’s Jesse James artifice as the restorer of Whiting’s eBay find.  Metadata embedded in the electronic image includes a copyright claim to the image in Rhodes’ name.

Among formal forensic science analysts,  alterations to historical artifacts equate to evidence tampering. To be properly authenticated, a photographic image must remain in its unaltered condition as found.

__________________________________________________

Fake image of Jesse James, claimed by Justin Whiting, 2018

UPDATE: April 29, 2018

Failing to convince anyone that his claimed image is Jesse James, Justin Whiting now is promoting a new image h claims is Jesse James between 16 and 18 year of age.

As usual, Whiting disregards history altogether. Between the ages of 16 and 18, Jesse James had become a wartime guerrilla with no income to afford a good suit and fancy tie.

As the disease of the con artist continues to seize upon Justin Whiting, he lo continues to issue new photo identities of himself.

In this image, Whiting appears suspiciously to be  Neal David Rhodes, Whiting’s photographic authority identified above.

Merchants in identity theft
1. Justin Whiting’s public relations photo for hi claimed Jesse James image 2. Justin Whiting’s replacement photo after being disproved. 3. Neal David Rhodes of image-restore

Called out on his image likeness with Neal David Rhodes of image-restore, Justin Whiting now has reverted to a  more youthful image of his middle-aged self.

Merchant of identity theft in waiting

__________________________________________________

RELATED

Part I – Jesse James Family Discredits 7£ eBay Find of Justin Whiting

Part II – Historic Photo Fraud Produces a Merchant of Identity Theft

Part III – Photo Experts of Convenience Juke Identity Theft

Part IV –  Forensic Science Proves “7£ eBay find” NOT Jesse James

 

Jesse James Family Discredits 7£ eBay Find of Justin Whiting

Novice Con in UK Branded a

Merchant of Identity Theft

 

Fake tintype claimed to be Jesse James
“Just another entry in the parade of “newly discovered” photos of Jesse that have been “authenticated” by comparing them to a photo that isn’t Jesse. “- CHUCK RABAS, Kansas City, Mo.

Can’t a year go by without some fool huckster who seeks fifteen minutes of fame claims a fake Jesse James photo is authentic?

2018 has just begun, and the witlessness has happened again. This time with a 7£ tintype find on eBay.

Regrettably, the pitch for the present folly falls far short of the sublimity achieved by polished con artists. The hucksters for this fraudulent Jesse James picture only rate top notch for amateurism.

Faithfully following the proven template of sharpies and swindlers of fake Jesse James photos, these amateurs step readily and willingly into a template for a crime. The family of Jesse James brands them as merchants of identity theft.

Recent Fake Jesse James Images

Linear forensics applied to authentic image of Jesse James with a claimed image
Linear forensics applied by Mark Bampton to Lois Gibson’s alleged authentication of the claimed Jesse James image yields plainly visible discrepancies in the Bob Ford/Jesse Jame photo hoax.

In 2016-2017, hoo-ha raged over the Bob Ford/Jesse James photo hoax.  In its first stage, a standard template of con artistry failed miserably, dragging the Houston, Texas Police Department into the gutter with it. With no substantive evidence to support the image claim, the hoax then advanced to a surprising second level. The hoax transitioned into a reality TV show. Television produced a sham auction of the tintype, claiming a final bid of $35,000 that was literally unbelievable. No record exists of the money being paid. More so, no image of Jesse James ever has sold for more than $2,000. Justin Whiting laughably waits for his tintype to fetch him $2 million US.

Fake Jesse James image disproved by an authentic one.
Forensic science proves a claimed Jesse James tintype is not authentic.

Then arrived a claimant to Jesse James kinship. He hawked a photo from his family possessions.  The claimant could not prove his kinship any more than he could prove his ambrotype was Jesse James.  He only proved that suckers exist for fraudulent Jesse James imagery. The ambrotype never reached the auctioneer’s advertised value of $12,000. The ambrotype sold at auction for a paltry $300.

An Obsessive-Compulsive eBay Collector in the United Kingdom

America has grown weary of fake Jesse James photos. Delusional con artists abound, and self-appointed “authenticators” always are ready to aid the con. It’s no surprise that the infection of the fake photo phenomenon has crossed the ocean to the UK. After all, the United Kingdom is the ancestral seat of tabloid journalism and fake news. Just ask any of the country’s kings or queens, Will Shakespeare or Rupert Murdoch. Tea is not tea without one’s purple prose and fantasy fulfillment.

Justin Whitiing
Justin Whiting tries to fool the public into paying him $2 million for his tintype of a fake Jesse James

In Lincolnshire, England is the town of Spalding. There sits Justin Whiting. He is out of work and confined to his computer screen by a back injury. Whiting is a middle-aged man with a childish imagination that further cripples his well-being. Lonely as Jane Austin, Whiting trolls eBay for excitement. He likes old photos. On eBay, one old tintype caught his eye.

EBay ad for a tintype of an unknown Victorian man.
The eBay ad that Justin James now swindles as his authentic image of Jesse James.

The eBay ad announced, “Victorian Tintype Photo, Young Man in dark Suit Standing by Chair 1870-1879.”

The ad contained no claim that the image was Jesse Woodson James, America’s folk-lore outlaw. Whiting, however, thought something about the image was familiar. With no immersive knowledge of Jesse James history, photography forensics, or family genetics, Justin Whiting made the sole determination that the tintype he bought on eBay is Jesse James.

Seized by the irrational insanity of his conviction, Whiting searched for other discoveries he could manufacture. He found another image he believed was Jesse James.

Claimed to be Jesse James by Justin Whiing
Justin Whiting claims this, too, is an image of Jesse James. Whiting says he has an entire box full of photos of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and Abraham Lincon!

Going off the deep end of all rationality, Justin Whiting furthermore claimed he has another old tintype of the Jim and Bob Younger of the Younger Gang.

Claimed to be Bob and Jim Younger of th Younger Gang by Justin Whiting
Justin Whiting says these two characters are Bob and Jim Younger of th Younger Gang. Whiting provides no substantiation.

 The Con Man Self-Revealed

In the full bloom of his self-delusion, Justin Whiting reached out to the Jesse James family for the approval and justification he needed. He queried the James family historian, Eric F James, publisher of the James family’s web site Stray Leaves that routinely debunks the fraud inflicted upon Jesse James history and the Jesse James family. James also is the author of the biographical history of the James family, Jesse James Soul Liberty. The James Preservation Trust, which James administers, archives a large collection of submissions claimed to be Jesse James that James receives routinely on a weekly, if not daily, basis.

James denied Whiting’s tintype is an image of Jesse James. In a series of email correspondence, Whiting repetitively pestered James with false claims and fake photos. James considered blocking Whiting’s email. Since Whiting had made no public claim, James left the line of communication open. Whiting since has been put on the James family’s watch list of Jesse James con artists.

The span of Whiting’s email, now on record, reveals Whiting’s delusion, his obsession, his childish crass belligerence, and hucksterism.

Justin Whiting taunts the Jesse James family who discredits his tintype as a fake Jesse James. “well I don’t see you saying anything ? where’s the fight you and the family said you was going to put up Been a week its all over the world news. You aint said nothing because you know now it genuine. justin”

In the experience of the James family, fraudsters like Whiting reveal themselves given time. Eric F. James perceives in Whiting’s most recent email  Whiting’s lack of education, an absence of basic grammar, and a narrow-minded, self-centered pathology.

Now that Whiting has gone public with his claim, soon the James family will publish the email correspondence between Whiting and James. The James family believes the general public can make its own, independent determination after reading Whiting’s own written record. Social media already has been falling in favor of the James family for a while.

RELATED

Part I – Jesse James Family Discredits 7£ eBay Find of Justin Whiting

Part II – Historic Photo Fraud Produces a Merchant of Identity Theft

Part III – Photo Experts of Convenience Juke Identity Theft

Part IV – Forensic Science Proves “7£ eBay Find” NOT Jesse James

 

About My Second Great-Grandpa Nick Dawson

By Stephanie Dawson Morris

The story of the murder of Nick Dawson is told in the book Jesse James Soul Liberty, Vol I. In the chapter “An Independent Free Man,” John James “of Alvarado” recounts his early days on the Texas prairie when Nick Dawson and his family, from Woodford County in Kentucky, were his neighbors.

Nicholas Henry “Nick” Dawson, born February 3, 1838, in Woodford County, Kentucky; murdered July 12, 1870, in Wise County, Texas.

In this multi-part series, Stephanie Dawson Morris updates the Dawson family history, revealing the undaunted character that defines  Dawson men from John Singleton Mosby to the Dawson Massacre and beyond.

___________________________________________________________________

One story I remember is that great grandpa Nick Dawson was shot 29 times with arrows before he died.  I have never been able to substantiate that, except for the story in the paper when they found the old pioneer cemetery. The story said he was “mutilated” when they found him.

I also remember hearing there was a saddle that was covered in silver conchos. The saddle was on the horse he was riding.  It was a gift from the townspeople for his services. I don’t know what kind of “services.”  Anyway, I asked what happened to the saddle. I heard it was cut up and divided among the Comanche who killed him.

Supposedly, that was how they found which of the Comanche were guilty. They still had the pieces of silver on their person.  Of course, I cannot verify this either.

Samuel “Sam” Houston Jr. 1793-1863. His father, Sam Huston Sr. 1745-1807, fought with Daniel Morgan’s Rifles in the American Revolution, besides the numerous rebel Baptists preachers who were supported by Frank & Jesse James father, John M. James. In Texas, Sam Huston Jr. commanded Jackson Bunyan Bradley, the father-in-law of John James “of Alvarado” who was Nick Dawson’s neighbor.
Sam Houston’s son, Samuel Houston III 1843-1894. It is unlikely Sam Houston attended the funeral of Nick Dawson since Sam Houston pre-deceased Nick. However, it is possible that Sam Houston III may have attended. During the Civil War, Sam Houston III was incarcerated in Camp Douglas Union Prison in Chicago together with David Hunt James and Richard Skinner James who were captured with John Junt Morgan.,

 

It was said that Sam Huston was greatly saddened by Grandpa’s death and attended the funeral…again, I don’t know if this is true.

Another story was that he and Great Grandma Mary had several children, as you know. They also had taken in an Indian child by the name of Blueberry.  Well, the story has it that while Grandpa Nick was away from home Blueberry had come flying through the door of the cabin and told Grandma that Indians had surrounded the cabin and were going to attack and raid.

Mary Elizabeth Morton Dawson 1833-1915, wife of Nick Dawson

Grandma had the lanterns all lit inside the cabin. She had all the children put on hats and jackets. They held sticks as if they were guns. Then they walked back and forth in front of the windows.  Grandma then would have them exchange clothing and walk in front of the windows of another room. So, on it went, to trick the Indians into thinking there were a lot of people in the house guarding it with weapons.  Apparently, the ruse worked because the next morning the Indians were gone. There was a sign of them having been there.

I do know that great-grandmother Mary filed for a government stipend to recover the value of the horses, saddle, and money of about a hundred dollars, or so.  It was some kind of recovery act. I did find the application.

She also applied for a Confederate Widows Pension which was signed with an X as Mary could not read or write.

Mary Dawson pension application
Pension application of Mary Dawson
Mary Dawson pension affidavit
Information affidavit of Mary Dawson’s pension application
Witness affidavit in Mary Dawson’s pension application. As the spouse of Frances Elizabeth “Fanny” Dawson, signatory Judge Griffin Ford was a son-in-law Nick and Mary Dawson. His son William Walter “Willie” Ford is a grandson of Nick and Mary.

None of us, still living, know what happened to the 1200 acres, or so, that were awarded to Grandpa Nick for enlisting in the Texas Rangers/Militia.  We assume it was sold to provide for the children.

End logo

RELATED: 

Belle Star’s visit to John James “of Alvarado” shortly after the murder of Nick Dawson.

Dawson DNA Project

FREE eBook: The Ancestry, Descendants, & Kinship of Nicholas Henry “Nick” Dawson

The Largest Knights of the Golden Circle Treasure Ever

BOOK REVIEW: Myers, Jack, Knight’s Gold: The Largest Documented KGC Treasure Ever Discovered (Jack O’Llantern Press, 2016) pp. iv +498, illustrations, endnotes, no bibliography or index, ISBN 9781539896562, soft cover $18.95

By Nancy B. Samuelson 

Like a lot of books about the Knights of the Golden Circle (KGC) and the tales about treasure that the KGC supposedly buried to finance a second Civil War, this work contains a lot of speculations, garbles a lot data, and contains a ton of misinformation. The book is tedious to read, everything the author says he repeats at least three times.

Knight’s Gold
Knight’s Gold: The Largest Documented KGC Treasure Ever Discovered by Jack Myers

A lot of the book deals with two treasure troves found in Baltimore, Maryland. Both of these troves are believed by the author to have been buried in basements by members of the KGC. Little factual data and a lot of questionable information is given to support this theory. We are asked to believe that two teenagers who found the first trove carried five thousand gold coins home in their pockets and shoes! A practice problem from the book, New Practical Arithmetic, published in Boston in 1875 is construed by the author to be a coded message by the agents of the Knights of the Golden Circle in Baltimore concerning the buried treasure.

Ray's New Practical Arithmatic
A coded treasure message published in 1875?

 

Another reported treasure trove is located within Victorio Peak in New Mexico. This area is now on the White Sands Test Range. A lot of various stories are related about this reported treasure trove. The odor of fraud permeates almost all of what is reported about this supposed treasure location.

The most bizarre “treasure” parts of the book deal with none other than America’s most famous bandit, Jesse Woodson James. 

The James boys did not spend their loot but socked it away to help fund the Knights of the Golden Circle and the second Civil War. No mention is made of all the race horses the James brothers bought, raced and bet on.

Almost all of the off the wall stuff published about Jesse James is trotted out in this book. Orvis Houk, Del Schrader, Ron Pastore, Henry J. Walker and a variety of other questionable James literature is quoted.(Somehow Betty Duke and her claim that her great-grandfather, James L. Courtney, was the real Jesse James got left out. This must have been an oversight.) This specious material is jumbled in with material from well written and well researched books. The author makes no effort to select the wheat from the chaff in any of this.

The James material is all a total tangle of out and out falsehoods, misinformation and speculation. One fiction novel even is cited to support some of this material.

Examples of some of this material are: (1) William Clark Quantrill was head of the KGC’s Knights of the Iron Hand; (2)John Newman Edwards wrote dime novels after the war; (3) After the war Jesse James worked as a bounty hunter and tried to go straight; (4) Gov. Crittenden appointed Sheriff James Timberlake as a deputy U. S. marshal (these are federal appointments); (5) Sheriff Timberlake went to New Mexico after he collected his reward and likely helped stash some of the Victorio Peak treasure;  (6) Albert Pike started the KKK:  etc. etc. etc. The nonsense boggles the imagination!

End logo

RELATED

Jesse James, Lost Treasure, & The Golden Circle – Where’s the Beef?

Making (Up) History Every Day

The Latest Fake History from Ron Pastore

James-Younger Gang Journal Pans Jesse James Hidden Treasure

Knights of the Golden Circle Exposed

Official website for the family of Frank & Jesse James

Subscribe Me for Latest Updates

Stray Leaves logo 600x239Signup for our newsletter and get notified when we publish new articles for free!