Tag Archives: Confederate

The SIFT for April 2019

The Sift is a periodic omnibus of significant, but smaller, snippets of history, genealogy, and news, received behind the scenes & sifted daily at Stray Leaves.



Adina Brown Speaks of Diversity & Belonging

Adina Brown is a James descendant. Her mother and grandfather are Elizabeth Lee “Libby” James and the late Sgt. Robert Lee James of Midland, Texas. See “Our American-Aboriginal Family – The Love Story of Robert Lee James & Susan Ann Syron.”

On the side of her father Craig Onan Brown, Adina descends from the original Aboriginal people of Australia. Both sides of this family treasure education.

At present, Adina is attending the University of Canberra. From UC, Adina talks about discovering diversity and what it means for her.

Adina Brown at the University of Canberra

“Belonging means feeling comfortable to be yourself in the environment or group around you. It is to feel welcomed and feel as if any of your differences as a person are overlooked or accepted and appreciated. I call Western Sydney home and I was born and raised in Penrith. My siblings and parents still live there so it’s a massive change moving away, but a big reason why I feel like I belong to UC is the diversity of the students and community. Everyone appreciates you for you and is so welcoming and kind. As I got accepted, I found out that my Uncle was the first Aboriginal to graduate UC, so it made me feel as if I was meant to be at UC and be a part of the community. I feel like I can be myself a UC because of how supportive everyone is around, most first year students are in the same shoes with beginning university and living away from home. Staff are very helpful, they not only point you in the right direction for services but are happy to give advice and listen to any you may have.”

– Adina Brown
Adina Brown with her mother Elizabeth Lee “Libby” James Brown

Lawsuit has Implications for Con Artists & Identity Thieves Engaging in Historical Photo Fraud

We’ll be monitoring this lawsuit most intently. Its outcome could put an end to the proliferation of fake photos of Frank and Jesse James. The lawsuit also could end the identity theft of the Jesse James family.

Tamara Lanier is suing Harvard University for wrongful expropriation of historic images she says depicts two of her ancestors. Her lawsuit petitions for Harvard to turn over the subject photos, to acknowledge her ancestry, and payment to Lanier of an unspecified amount of damages.

While Lanier’s ancestry is not stated, Stray Leaves suspects she may be related to the Jesse James family. Many of the Lanier family share kinship with the James, including music legend Quincy Jones and famed American playwright Tennessee Williams, aka Thomas Lanier Williams III. Thomas Stratton Lanier and spouse Margaret Sallee turned out to be the original owners and builders of a 1903 Victorian home in Danville, Kentucky, once owned by Stray Leaves’ publisher Eric F. James.

If Lanier wins her suit, Harvard’s images must be returned to Lanier as property due to heirs. This outcome would have an enormous impact on the number of fraudulent photos now in circulation that are claimed to be Frank or Jesse James. If Lanier is successful in her lawsuit, the James family could accept the false claims of hoaxers, con artists, and profiteers of historical images as true. The James then could lay claim and collect the images as being property due to heirs. In the end result, the James could take the fake images out of circulation.


Happy 100th Birthday, Lawrence Ferlinghetti

On today, March 24, 2019, I make an exception to my policy of not celebrating birthdays. A 100th birthday is a milestone of passage in eternity’s time frame. Few people achieve it. Even less reach the marker while still being an influence in so many lives.

Poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti in front of his City LIghts Bookstore in San Francisco

When Ferlinghetti’s second centenary arrives, you and I will be gone and forgotten. But Ferlinghetti still will be here and relevant. This was perceived decades ago by Charles Michael James of our James family. C.M. was among the first to publish Ferlinghetti’s work at his Fantome Press. The archives of Fantome Press can be found at the University of Ohio. You can find Lawrence Ferlinghetti in his bookstore.


Stray Leaves Contributes to Pocahontas Descendants Initiative

Recently Stray Leaves made its own contribution to the Pocahontas Descendants Initiative sponsored by the Community Engagement Dept. of Gloucester County, Virginia. The program is described in this article.

Matoaka “Lady Rebecca” Pocahontas 1595-1616/1617

The report which Stray Leaves provided identifies over 3,000 known descendants, some of whom are James relatives with Pocahontas ancestry.

If you have Pocahontas ancestry, we urge you to submit your own contribution.


Do You Qualify for Chickasaw Citizenship?

With the recent discovery of the James ancestry of Susannah James and her lines of Chickasaw descendants, we now learn that today’s living descendants in those lines – if there are any – may be eligible for Chickasaw citizenship.

If anyone pursues this, please inform the rest of your family at Stray Leaves.

Who Says Nonsense Like This?

We think it is solely kooks, crazies, and con artists who promote fake photos and bogus history about Jesse James. Not so.

In this article, Brian Haines falsely claims:

“Through the years, the [James] gang amassed hordes of gold and buried it for safekeeping in a number of places in Kansas and Nebraska. Survivors of the gang claimed to have not known where James hid the gold. According to a number of Old West historians, the gold is still hidden in the ‘hidey holes’ where it was buried so many years ago”

Brian Haines, Executive Director of the McLeod County Historical Society & Museum in Hutchinson, Minnesota

Who is Brian Haines? Brian is the Executive Director of the McLeod County Historical Society & Museum in Hutchinson, Minnesota. He holds a BA in History from St. Cloud State University. You think he would know better than to promote fake history, or even play loosey-goosey with it. Unfortunately, not so.

We particularly liked the comment to this post by Chuck Rabas:

“I’m not going to address all of Mr. Haines’ ill-informed claims, but only the two that were unforgivably ignorant:

1. ‘When the Civil War broke out in America in 1861, James and his brother, Frank, joined a group of Confederate guerillas [sic] known as Quantrill’s Raiders.’

“When the war broke out? Frank joined the Centerville Home Guards in May, 1861. He was captured shortly after the Battle of Wilson’s Creek and later paroled. After the war, he stated that he first met Quantrill in May of 1863. Frank was named as one of the guerrillas led by Fernando (or Ferdinand) Scott who took part in a raid at Richfield (now Missouri City), Missouri on May 15, 1863. Jesse did not join the guerrillas until the spring of 1864, and then it was the band led by Wm. T. “Bloody Bill” Anderson.

2. ‘Through the years, the gang amassed hordes of gold and buried it for safekeeping in a number of places in Kansas and Nebraska.’

“In the 15 years from 1866 through 1881, the total amount taken in robberies in which Jesse has been implicated was approximately $250,000 — an average of between $16,000 and $17,000 per year. (Sources vary, so I’m using the highest amounts I’ve seen cited.) Most of that amount was paper — currency, bonds, etc., with only a small percentage (a VERY generous guess would be 10% to 15%) in gold. If one takes into consideration that the loot from each robbery had to be divided among the participants, and factors in Jesse’s expensive passion for horse racing, there’s scarcely ‘hordes of gold’ left to bury.”


More Jesse James Kinship Than Anyone

I invite you to spend an hour out West with Hayden Calvert “Bud” Cooper. Bud is the founder, former mayor, and now museum keeper of Myton, Utah.

At age 92, Bud has more family connections to Jesse James than anybody I have found.

Bud is a grandson of Hayden Calvert & Sallie Morgan of Harrodsburg, Kentucky. This makes Bud a 6th cousin of Frank James’ cohort John Pendleton “Black Jack” Chinn of Harrodsburg. Bud also is a 1st cousin to Nicholas Dorsey. This makes Bud a 6th cousin also of Frank & Jesse James. Bud is even related to Frank’s wife Annie Ralston. His other kinship connections are too numerous to mention. Enjoy Bud Cooper now. He is living history.


Graves Family Reunion – 2019

GRAVES FAMILY cousins are returning to Kentucky. Everyone is invited.

From Fayette County, Kentucky, Mary Jane Graves & Lloyd J. Goodwin are the 3rd great grandparents of actor Steve McQueen:
Lloyd J. Goodwin & Mary Jane Graves
. Elizabeth Elenora Goodwin & Pike Montgomery Thompson
.. John William Thomson & Julia Franklin Graves
… Lillian Mae Thomson & Victor Lee Crawford
…. Julia Crawford & Terence William McQueen
….. Terence Stephen “Steve” McQueen

Confederate Statues Removed

The statue of John Hunt Morgan, that once graced the entrance to the Fayette County Courthouse, now resides in Lexington Cemetery.

This statue of John Hunt Morgan formerly stood before the Fayette County Courthouse in Lexington, Ky. There, it was in view of the Second National Bank of Lexington, founded by David Hunt James who served with Morgan together with his brother Richard Skinner James. Following the recent brouhaha over Confederate statues, Morgan’s monument now stands in Lexington Cemetery where all of these warriors rest.

The Second National Bank of Lexington founded by David Hunt James. The bank is the building to the right with the arched entry. The width of the building is less than 25 feet giving the bank its nickname of “the hole in the wall.”
The statue of John Cabell Breckenridge also has been removed to Lexington Cemetery.

The Morgan’s Men Association has announced, there will be a memorial service at the Morgan equestrian statue in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, KY at 3 PM on June 2, 2019. The Sons of Confederate Veterans, United Daughters of the Confederacy, Order of Confederate Rose, and Morgan’s Men Association will participate. All are welcome to come to honor General Morgan and the Confederate Veterans.



Losing a Parent Changes Us Forever

How many more stories are yet to reveal themselves from within the Stray Leaves‘ genealogy database?

Genealogists always consider the fact of a demise as raw data. How many of us, though, consider the physical and emotional effects of that demise upon those left behind? That life continues to live after death.

Losing a parent changes us both psychologically and physically. Scientists now say, there’s proof. To more fully comprehend what is family, hereditary health demands that we look beyond what is evident in raw genealogical data.

Have you shared your story with Stray Leaves of what happened to you when your parent(s) died?


Second-born Children Are More Likely to Make Trouble

If Jesse James had a psychiatrist, he may have heard about this in therapy. We know, he did not.

That leaves the rest of the living James family to consider the principle. So, listen up, second-borns!

Read this article. Then leave us your story, reactions, or comments.


Old Jesse James Con Artists Never Die. They Just Propagate the Next Generation.

Daniel J. Duke

Daniel J. Duke is the son of the notorious Betty Dorsett Duke.

You remember Betty. She’s the one who accused the Leaf Blower of trying to murder her. Then she went to the FBI with her complaint, because police authorities in Texas wouldn’t act on her complaint. She proudly touted the fact the FBI was investigating the Leaf Blower. After the FBI did, the FBI shut down Betty Dorsett Duke and her false claims.

Then surprisingly, Betty died. Exposed by her own family for the factually true identity she denied, and exposed for her true identity as a con artist, Betty Dorsett Duke had nothing to live for.

None of that has stopped young Daniel J. Duke from following in the path of his mother.

Daniel falsely claims, as his mother did, that he is a descendant of Jesse Woodson James. Like his mother, Daniel has written a book based on his own childish fantasies and wishful thinking about Jesse James. To promote the book, Daniel J. Duke pulls in all his mother’s old bogeymen, like Texas Attorney General Waggoner Carr.

After all, Texas is the progenitor and safe harbor of Jesse James hoaxers. Most all come from Texas. They still do.

COMMENTS FROM FACEBOOK:

  • Colleen Campbell Taylor Is he the son that she always said looked just like Jesse James? NOT!
  • Chuck Rabas When Betty was working on her second book about her absurd claim, she contacted me by phone. I was a bit surprised, as I had made my opinion of her inane claims quite clear on a number of internet forums. In the course of our telephone conversation, she indicated a desire to use some of my comments made during the conversation in her upcoming book. I informed her that if she used any of them in a context that would in any way appear that I supported ANY of her claims, I would sue. I was among those she subsequently insisted were hired by Eric James to destroy her.
  • Matthew Schmidt Yup and a lot of fake Jesse W James, Wyatt Earp, Billy The Kid daguerreotypes seem to show up for sale out of Texas as well?! Cons… all of them. IMHO.

RELATED: Murder & Betty Dorsett Duke

Confederates in Montana Territory

BOOK REVIEW: Robison, Ken, Confederates in Montana Territory: In The Shadow of Price’s Army, (South Carolina: The History Press, 2014.) 190 pp., photos, illustrations, bibliography/notes, index. ISBN 978-1-62619-603-2, paperback, $19.99

By Nancy B. Samuelson

Confederates in Montana Terrirtory-Ken Robison
Confederates in Montana Territory: In the Shadow of Price’s Army by Ken Robison

I was eager to dig into this book as I am a long time student of Missourians in the Civil War. However, I was very disappointed in the book. It is an attractive book with a lot of good photos and illustrations, but the research is only skin deep.  The title of the book is misleading as only about four of the men discussed in the book served in Price’s Army. The author does not have a very good grasp on the history of Price’s Army and the guerrilla units associated with Price. The book contains several errors. In the forward to the book, 1859 is given as the year California entered the Union. The correct year is 1850. Colonel Thoroughman was said to have been taken to a prison in Quincy, Illinois after he was captured. There was no Union prison at Quincy, he most likely was taken to the prison at Alton, Illinois. The Moore brothers were said to have gone south into Kentucky and spend a night with John M. James, the grandfather of Jesse James. A good trick indeed, as John M. James died in 1827.

Confederates in Montana
An early tintype, owned by Ken Robison, showing unidentified Confederate soldiers in Montana Territory.

There are two stories in the book concerning supposed Quantrill men. The first story is about James Berry. This chapter is reasonably close to the facts; Berry did serve with Quantrill for a short time. He also did participate in a robbery with the Sam Bass gang and was killed when there was an attempt to apprehend him. The author states that Berry’s family survived to become prominent in Montana history, but leaves the reader completely in the dark about the family’s contribution to the state’s history.

Ken Robison, author
Author Ken Robison

The chapter about Langford “Farmer” Peel, is titled “When Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction”. A good title, since this tale is almost entirely fiction. Langford Peel never served with Quantrill or anybody else during the Civil War. He hung out in mining camps in California, Utah, Nevada and Montana during the time of the Civil War. He was a rough customer and was accused of several murders. He was finally shot and killed in Montana. The tale about some of Quantrill’s men hijacking a steamboat to come after Peel is from a newspaper article from the Great Falls Tribune of April 30, 1922. The story is complete fiction.

There were a number of men from Price’s Army who did go to Montana and who became prominent men. John C. C. “Coon” Thornton and Thomas L. Napton immediately come to mind, but the author ignored these men. Several Quantrill men are known to have gone to Montana too, one served as the Sheriff of Lewis and Clark County. These folks are also ignored. The book is an easy read but it is history light-weight.

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This book review is co-published with the James-Younger Gang Journal.

HISTORIC TINTYPE of RHODA MAY-JAMES

Rhoda May-James

RHODA MAY (1806-1889) is the stalwart spouse of the “talented, but erratic” Rev. Joseph Martin James (1791-1848).

Rhoda withstood all transgressions, indignities, & social ostracism that her husband created with admirable Teutonic stoicism.

When acute alcoholism took Joe’s life at age fifty-seven, Rhoda became a forty-two year old widow, left alone to raise nine children.

For the next forty-one years of her life, Rhoda May James resolutely carried the social burden of her husband’s disgrace. She watched as the Civil War divided her children and tore apart her family. She never remarried.

Home of Rhoda May & Joseph Martin James, built circa 1854

Thanks to Gwen Smith-Gershwin, who is a fourth great granddaughter of Rev. Joseph Martin James & Martha  McAlister, Joe’s first wife, this tintype image of Rhoda May now can be appreciated.

The original tintype was handed down in the family through Rhoda Alice Owens-Cole-Dowell, Rhoda May’s granddaughter & namesake.

Rhoda May

Prior to the contribution of this tintype image to The James Preservation Trust, the only known image of Rhoda May was a framed oval colored photograph. This colored image still hangs in the home of Nelva Anne Herrin, a great granddaughter of Joe Martin & Rhoda May James. Nelva Anne’s contemporary home, built by her father Lem Garland Herrin, sits opposite the decayed ruin of the home built & occupied by her great grandparents Joseph Allen Herrin & Susan Harriet James on the original settlement lands of John M. James at Shopville in Pulaski County, Kentucky. Susan Harriet James is a daughter of Joe Martin James & Rhoda May.

SOME CHILDREN OF RHODA MAY-JAMES

Edward Perry James & his family. Namesake Rhoda May James sitting at her father's knee.

EDWARD PERRY JAMES (1847-1931) was only a year old when his father died. He grew up in his father’s stone house in Shopville, married Elizabeth Langford, & raised a family of nine children in the same house. His youngest child, he named Rhoda May James, after his beloved mother. Progressively selling off his land holdings in Shopville, he removed his family to a new home he built in Berea, Kentucky, where he died.

Susan Harriet James-Herrin

SUSAN HARRIET JAMES (1843-1920) was five years old when Joseph Martin James died. She was thirty years old when she married Joseph Allen Herrin, a Union veteran of the Civil War.

In a diary Herrin kept during the war, he noted the wounding of Susan Harriet’s brother, Andrew James.

Home of Susan Harriet James & Allen Custer Herrin

Herrin was returned from the war for almost a decade, when he and Susan Harriet married in the home of Rhoda May.

On the land of Susan Harriet’s grandfather, John M. James, in Shopville, the couple built themselves a new home. The home remained occupied by her descendants until about 1947, when the couple’s grandson, Lem Garland Herrin, built his bride, Thelma Hayes, a new home directly opposite the lane of the old home.

Mary Harriet James-Owens

MARY HARRIET JAMES (1842-1935), nicknamed Mary Jane, was age ten when her father died. Left alone with Rhoda May to defend the family home during the Battle of Mill Springs, she successfully retained hold of the single horse they owned against marauding soldiers, by claiming half her family fought on one side while the other half fought on the other. Shortly after the war, she married Union veteran Daniel J. Owens, who had been imprisoned during the conflict. She was mother to ten children.  At age ninety, she flew in an airplane for the first time. Flying over five states, she sang “Glory, Glory Halleluiah” and exited the airplane singing “Nearer My God to Thee.”

Rev. Martin Nall James

Rev. MARTIN NALL JAMES (1833-1911) was fifteen when Joe Martin James died. He became a Baptist preacher, but not one like his father. At twenty-five he married Susannah Elizabeth Matthews. The couple elected themselves Baptist missionaries & migrated into Missouri. During the war, he fought on the Confederate side. The couple bore eight children.

Rhoda Ann James, granddaughter & namesake of Rhoda May

CYRENIUS WAITE JAMES (1831-1911) was age seventeen at the time of his father’s death He was Rhoda’s second eldest child. Cy bore witness to much of the abuse suffered by his mother. He and his other siblings also suffered the social stigma brought upon their family by their father’s bigamous third marriage to the youthful Permelia Estepp. Though his half-siblings with Permelia lived in plain view across Flat Lick Creek, the two families remained completely estranged from each other. Cy fought for the Union in the war and was taken prisoner. In prison in Georgia, he awoke to a nightmare of his daughter dying, at the same time she choked to death on some corn In Illinois. Prior to the war he removed his family there. Afterward, he walked them to Texas, where his descendants live today. No picture of Cy is known to exist.  His daughter, Rhoda Ann James, named for his mother and shown here, operated his bank in Rhone, Texas.

A NEPHEW OF RHODA MAY-JAMES

John Smith May, nephew of Rhoda May. Courtesy of the Kentucky Historical Society

JOHN SMITH MAY (1835-Aft. 1891) was a farmer and a teacher before the Civil War started. Shortly after joining the Confederate Army he was captured & imprisoned in Ohio. After the Battle of Chancellorsville, he was exchanged. He joined John Hunt Morgan in Sparta, Tennessee, but was captured later again with Morgan, David Hunt James, & Richard Skinner James. He was secondly incarcerated at Camp Douglas in Chicago, but later sent to Virginia. He surrendered with Gen. Robert E. Lee at Appomattox. Afterwards he returned to Kentucky to resume teaching. By Elizabeth McQueary he had ten children and by Sallie Thurmond two more. In Pulaski County, he became Superintendent of Schools, the Court Clerk for the county, and was elected to the lower house of the Kentucky State Legislature. He and Rhoda May-James died within a few years of one another.

Chris James says, I can touch, taste, & experience the Civil War

Chris James, Re-enactor

Chris James, born             Christopher David James, is a Civil War re-enactor with The “Tuckahoe Braves,”  27th North Carolina, Company D, Confederate States of America.

He appears in the photo galleries of the group’s web site.

Chris lives in Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he is employed in the security office for Fort Bragg. A native of Stillwater, Oklahoma, Chris settled in North Carolina following his real military service as a sergeant with the 2/504 Infantry. PIR 82nd, Airborne Division, having served in Afghanistan from December, 2002, to August, 2003.

On the James side of his family, Chris proudly claims his cousins, Frank & Jesse James. He’s also a cousin to Walmart founder Sam Walton, his aunt Anne being a close family confidant to the Walton family. On his grandmother’s side, Christ also claims the aviatior-industrialist Howard Hughes as a cousin.

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Of his re-enactments, Chris says,  “I try my best at re-enactments and living history events to be accurately as possible to do some justice to what our ancestors endured.”

Recently Chris asked for an enumeration of who among his James relatives served in the Civil War. Specifically he asked, who was on which side.

For the first time, a list now has been compiled from the family’s genealogy and appears below.

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UNION

Allen Custer Herrin, husband of Susan Harriet James: Oct 12, 1864, Discharged 2nd KY Volunteers, Cavalry Co F, Union

Andrew James, Union. Not identified in the genealogy, only in the diary of Allen Custer Herrin who comments on the death of Andrew James in service.

Cyrenius Waite James: Union. Wounded & POW. Company B, 79th Illinois Volunteer Infantry

John Thomas James:  Pvt. Company B, 12th Kentucky Volunteers, Union

Rev. John James 1862-1917:  Co E. 54th Kentucky Infantry, Union.

William Henry Williams James: Graduate West Point 1868. Commissioned a 2nd Lt. in the 24th United States Infantry. Fort Concho, San Angelo TX 24th Infantry, Company  K

Thomas Hardin Williams James: Attempted to enroll in the U. S. Naval Academy, but he did not pass the examination. Union

Henry James Newton: Union. Assisted Civil War photographer Matthew Brady.

CSA

Joel M. James: CSA, brother of John Thomas James

William R. James: CSA

Joseph McAlister “Mack” James: sympathetic to the North. His son Francis Marion James Sr. was CSA.

Andrew Jackson “A.J.” James, served under Preston Leslie & Sterling Price, CSA

William H. “Will” James 1835-1896: Was reported by Herrin in-law that he rode briefly with Frank & Jesse James, but returned home, all shot up and badly crippled for the rest of his life.

John C. Breckenridge Griffin 1824-1907: In the fall of 1861 he joined the Missouri Guards, Company E, Third Missouri Regiment, South. He served under General JOHN B. CLARK until 1863. He was in the Battle of Lexington, Missouri, and other battles. (3rd Division under Sterling Price.)

James Vardeman Matson: Davis Mounted Rifles, commanded by Captain James V. Matson. CSA

Robert Allen Williams James: Attended West Point. Co E, 11th Tennessee Infantry Regulars CSA

Burton Allen James: CSA sympathizer

Henry A. James 1837-Oct 2-4,1862. CSA Killed at Battle of Corinth, MS

Thruston P. “Tommy” James 1846-May 16, 1863. CSA Killed at Champion’s Hill, MS

David Hunt James: CSA, Co A, Second Regiment, Kentcuky Volunteer Cavalry. Jul 19, 1863: Captured at Buffington’s Island with Morgan’s Raiders, imprisoned at Camp Douglas, near Chicago, IL., paroled Feb 1865. Member of the John C. Breckenridge Camp, Confederate  Veteran Association.

Richard Skinner James: Morgan’s Men’s Association: James, Richard. A private Co. P.O.W. Camp Douglas rec’d Aug. 18, 1863 transferred to Point Lookout, MD Feb. 24, 1865.

Henry Field James Jr. b.1799: CSA sympathizer. Author of the book “Abolitionism Unveiled”

Oscar Dunreath West: CSA, never returned home from the war.

Robert Woodson Hite: Quantrill Guerilla

Clarence Jeff Hite
: Quantrill Guerilla

Thomas Martin “T.M: James: CSA sympathizer. Close friend of Jefferson Davis.

William Wythe James: undocumented family member. Served under Quantrill.

Alexander Franklin James, aka Frank James. Partisan guerilla with William Clarke Quantrill

Jesse Woodson James, aka Jesse James. Partisan guerilla with William Clarke Quantrill

UNDETERMINED

John Henry Griffin, 1814-1864, Murdered by James Vonsin, a soldier.

WATCH FOR UPDATES TO THIS LIST.