Tag Archives: James Younger Gang

James-Younger Gang Conference – 2017

James-Younger Gang-2017 Conference logo              CONFERENCE OPEN TO ALL – SIGN UP BELOW

Georgetown College, Scott Co. KY
Georgetown College, Georgetown, Kentucky

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CONFERENCE PROGRAM

Annual Conference 2017 – National James-Younger Gang Inc. Georgetown, Kentucky

What Happened in Missouri began in Kentucky

Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017

4:00 pm   Registration Comfort Suites

4:00-9:00  –  Author Fair & Book Signing

7:00 pm   Eddie Price, author of Widder’s Landing, performing “What I Saw at Cane Ridge.”

Friday, Sept 29, 2017

9-10:00:   Jesse James Identity Theft. Mark Bampton of Ampthill, England: Topic – A Forensic Analysis of the Bob Ford/Jesse James Photo Hoax

10:30-12:00:   Eric F. James, author of This Bloody Ground, Vol. II of Jesse James Soul Liberty; TopicThe story of Frank & Jesse’s grandfather John M. James from the American Revolution to revolution against banks

12:00-1:30:   Lunch

1:30-3:00:   Georgetown College

  • Dr. Glen Taul; Topic – Georgetown’s Records of Rev. Robert Sallee James & Rev. John James
  • Dr. James C. Klotter, Kentucky State Historian; Topic & author of The History and Culture of Central Kentucky, 1792-1852; Kentucky Justice, Southern Honor, and American Manhood

3:30-4:30:   TOUR   Ward Hall

  • Ron Bryant, former research historian, Kentucky History Center. Sustaining the Southern Plantation Life of William Ward, Richard Mentor Johnson, & their Lightfoot, Chinn, & Pence Slave Families

5:00:   Business Meeting

Saturday, Sept 30, 2017

9:00-10:00:   Shirl Marks, co-founder of The African-American Genealogy Group of Kentucky, descendant of enslaved Pence family; author of The Enslaved Pence & Chinn Families of Scott County

10:30-12:00:   Guerrilla Symposium: Topic – What Made a Civil War Guerrilla?

  • Gerald Fisher author of Guerrilla Warfare in Civil War Kentucky
  • James M. Pritchard, Civil War Guerrilla Collections at the Filson Historical Society, author of Embattled Capital, Frankfort During the Civil War
  • Dr. Thomas J. Sabetta of the University of Kentucky, currently writing two books, one about Capt. Delos T. “Yankee” Bligh who pursued the James Gang, and another on “Dynamite” Dick Mitchel, a rider with John Hunt Morgan, Basil Duke, Sue Munday, and Sam Berry.
  • Kent Masterson Brown Esq., author & film documentarian, The Civil War in Kentucky: Battle for the Bluegrass State, First editor Civil War magazine, former chairman of Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission & Perryville Battlefield Commission

12-1:30:   Lunch – Wallace Station – Box Lunch

1:30-5:00:   TOUR

7:00-10:00:   Banquet:  Wilshire’s Restaurant                                             Special Guest Speaker:                                                                                                         J. Mark Beamis, second great-grandson of Drury Woodson James      &  son of Joan Malley Beamis, author of Background of a Bandit.

J. Mark Beamis, son of Joan Beamis

Sunday, Oct 1, 2017 – Adjourned

Maps provided to self-tour the Bluegrass & additional historical sites

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ENTIRE CONFERENCE $89.00 – Includes Banquet dinner

THURSDAY ONLY $ 20.00

FRIDAY ONLY $ 30.00

SATURDAY ONLY $ 40.00 – Banquet excluded

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RESERVE HOTEL NOW

Comfort Suites-Georgetown KY
Comfort Suites Hotel, Georgetown, Kentucky

Discount room rates are available now at Comfort Suites in Georgetown, Kentucky.

The group rate for the James-Younger Gang is $85/night for two adults plus applicable taxes. $10 more for each additional person.  Amenities include a deluxe complimentary breakfast, indoor heated pool, fitness facility, guest laundry, & game room. Each suite has a micro fridge, coffee maker, hair dryer, alarm clock radio, iron & ironing board, sofa sleeper, and wired & wireless Internet.

CALL  (502) 868-9500 ext. 403 for James-Younger Gang reservations. The discount rate of $85/night will automatically apply after 8 rooms are booked. Prior to 8 rooms booked, a rate of $100/night applies. Reserve early to insure availability. Only 20 rooms have been set aside. The discount rate expires August 31, 2017. Click HERE for general hotel information.

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 CRAVING SOME SWAG ?

The official tee shirt of the James-Younger Gang and Family conference is available now.

Chose from 9 colors in sizes small to 6X.

Order by July 1 for July 15th delivery.

ORDER HERE

 

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RELATED:   Take a PREVIEW TOUR now with Dan Pence, Tom Nall, & Eric F. James as they make final conference arrangements.

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2017 JAMES-YOUNGER GANG – Diary of a Preview Tour

What Happened in Missouri began in Kentucky

Dan Pence at Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Ky.
Dan Pence, President of the James-Younger Gang, views the plot for the Confederate dead in Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg, Kentucky.

TOUR DIARY – DAY ONE

April 19, 2017 – Dan Pence and Tom Nall, president and past president of the International James-Younger Gang Inc., will arrive at the 200-year-old Hemp House here in Danville today. Then for three days, we will tour Kentucky and preview historic sites in preparation for the speaking events and tours that are scheduled for the 2017 annual conference in Georgetown come September.

Dan Pence-Tom Nall-Harrodsburg cemetery
Dan Pence & Tom Nall, president & past president of the James-Younger Gang, tour the Confederate cemetery at Hoordsburg, Kentucky

Today, we will begin at Constitution Square. We will talk about the enduring relationship between John M. James, Frank & Jesse’s grandfather, with Judge Harry Innes, his clerk & later Justice Thomas Todd, & Benjamin Sebastian of the Spanish Conspiracy. We will also address what role John M. James may have had in the ten Danville Conventions and how the Spanish Conspiracy led to his ruin.

Next, we will retrace the ride of Frank James, the Younger & Pence brothers with William Clark Quantrill when they rode through Danville in 1864 on a mission to “visit” President Lincoln.

At the family plot of the close Confederate ally of Frank James, John Pendleton “Black Jack” Chinn. Dan Pence stands beside the tombstone of Black Jack’s grandmother, Sarah White Stull Hardin-Chinn. Her husband Christopher Columbus Chinn is the namesake of Kit Chinn who traveled the racetrack circuit with Frank James in his retirement years. Black Jack rests behind Dan Pence among two rows of his Chinn and Morgan families.

We will tour their escape route from Danville to Perryville and up to Sally Van Arsdall’s farm outside Harrodsburg. There, Maj. James Bridgewater, whose wife was a Pence, caught up with the band and attacked them in the middle of a cold January night. Four of the band was killed. Previously, the James-Younger Gang Journal published my account of this event, “Why, Maj. Bridgewater?”

We will then tour Oakland Church cemetery where Quantrill ordered their fallen men to be buried. We also will visit Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg, where Frank James and Black Jack Chinn exhumed their slain from Oakland Church Cemetery and re-interred them in the Confederate plot at Spring Hill around 1898.

Nearby the family plot of Black Jack Chinn, Dan Pence tours the family plot of Franklin Pierce “Frank” James. In Harrodsburg, Frank James was the cashier of the Mercer County National Bank. Black Jack Chinn sat on its board of directors. Frank was twice elected Sheriff of Mercer County, and also was elected State Auditor. He halted construction of the new Kentucky State Capitol when the legislature failed to appropriate sufficient funding.

Returning to Danville, we will visit Bellevue Cemetery and the grave site of the grandparents of Clell Miller, Henry Logan Thurmond & Mary Kenley-Thurmond. Clell Miller was one of the James-Younger Gang. He was killed in the Northfield Bank robbery.

We will round off today’s tour in Danville with visits to Weisiger Park next to the Boyle County courthouse where Joseph McAlister James, aka Joseph McJames, operated the St. James Hotel. We also will stop by the parking lot on Third St. backing up to the Boyle County jail where Joseph McJames owned and operated James Hall, Danville’s first and original theater, and convention center.

In the coming two more days, we plan to tour in Woodford and Scott Counties.

DAY TWO  on TOUR 

Tombstone of Thomas Evans James, brother of Franklin Pierce “Frank” James. T.E. James operated the oldest dry goods firm in Harrodsburg – Hansford, James, & Co. His partner Smith Hansford rode with John Hunt Morgan, David Hunt James, & Richard Skinner James, both of whom were captured and sent to Camp Douglas Union Prison Camp in Chicago.

April 20, 2017 – Yesterday, after a full day of touring numerous historic sites relating to the pioneer settlement of John M. James in Kentucky and his pioneer families of Pence, Nalle, Vardiman, & Sallee, we ended our tour at Bellevue Cemetery in Danville.

Standing before the graves of Clell Miller’s grandparents, I received the ultimate compliment from Dan Pence. Turning to me, Dan said, “My grandfather would have loved to have known you.”

Tombstone Rev. Jesse Heah
Behind the tombstone of Thomas Evans James, Tom Nall spotted the tombstone of Rev. Jesse Head.  Rev. Head married President Abraham Lincoln’s parents, Thomas & Nancy Hanks Lincoln.

Dan’s grandfather is Samuel Anderson Pence, the author of I Knew Frank…I Wish I had Known Jesse. This book and its companion book Quantrill’s Guerillas 1861-1865 compiles Pence’s lifetime accumulation of history, stories, facts, and data relating to Pence’s personal relationship with the social communities and family of Frank & Jesse James. Dan edited and published his grandfather’s book posthumously. So much of Dan’s book is new and previously unpublished history. I have used this book often in my own research and writing.

Jesse Head plaque
Tombstone plaque for Rev. Jesse Head. “Rev. Jesse Head, Jan. 28, 1768-March 22, 1842. Preacher-Editor-Patriot. He married June 12, 1806, Thomas Lincoln & Nancy Hanks, parents of Abraham Lincoln. Jane Ramsey Head, April 10, 1768-August 30, 1851. Married Jesse Head January 9, 1789 and nobly shared with him the privations and triumphs of the life of a pioneer preacher.”
Jesse Head
Rev. Jesse Head 1768-1842 who married Abraham Lincoln’s parents

I was thrilled to think Dan thought so kindly about my research and writing. Dan’s generous compliment could not have thrilled me more.

Today, we continue our tour in Georgetown and Midway and the historic site related to the James family there.

DAY THREE on TOUR

April 21, 2017 – So far, very few complications have arisen regarding our programming for the September conference. Everything is working out well and in some cases better than first thought. This conference is going to be great!

However, while conducting our tour, revelations have occurred to us which surprised us. There really is no reason why the three of us, all raised in the upper Midwest, should find ourselves bound together by Jesse James. Yet, here we are.

Yesterday, Dan revealed his story “You have to go to Kentucky.”

Dan Pence-TomNall-Barbara Nall-Perryville Confederate Memorial
Dan Pence, Tom & Barbara Nall tour Perryville Battlefield and its memorial to the Confederate dead.

As a trained chemist, grown up In Michigan, Dan knew nothing of his connections to Jesse James. Not until Dan’s son brought home a book one day about Jesse James and Dan began to look at his grandfather’s box of memorabilia, did Dan begin to follow his path of spiritual discovery.

Dan Pence, Tom & Barbara Nall tour Logan’s Fort, a first stop for any migrant coming to Kentucky from Virginia in the early 1780s, including Frank and Jesse James’ grandfather, John M. James.

Following the neglected leads left to him, Dan began his journey. Dan’s door of discovery opened when a near stranger instructed him “You have to go to Kentucky. When Dan did, like me Dan discovered the unexpected.

In the Kentucky corporate offices of Maker’s Mark Bourbon, Dan met with Bill Samuel. Bill showed Dan Bill’s own neglected box of family memorabilia. Among the artifacts in Bill’s box were photos of Dan’s grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-great-grandfather.

Ever since then Dan has been on his own personal tour to discover what meaning Jesse James holds for him. Even on this preview tour of historic sites in Kentucky and after publishings his grandfather’s books, Dan is still learning more.

James-Younger Gang-2017 Conference logo

The three of us boys from the upper Midwest agree. We are traveling a curious path of divinity. We fully expect more revelations to come. Come to Kentucky, and you can, too. Join us and tour with us at the 2017 annual conference of the James-Younger Gang.

Lois Gibson-Sandy Mills Tintype Controversy Puzzles Great Britain – but not for long

In his forensic analysis, titled “Jesse James, Robert Ford, and the Tintype,” Great Britain’s Mark Bampton poses his question about the controversy in typical British fashion –  as a pun.

 “Who are these four?”

True Jesse James and Bob Ford-Fake Jesse James and Bob Ford
Cover image from Mark Bampton’s discourse, “Jesse James, Robert Ford, and the Tintype.”

Mark Bampton lives in Ampthill, which he describes as “a small Georgian town” in Bedfordshire, Great Britain.  Prompted by the reaction of the Jesse James family to the Bob Ford/Jesse James photo hoax, promoted by Lois Gibson and Sandy Mills and their circle of supporters,  Mark Bampton decided to apply his own scientific forensic analysis to the image controversy.  Not surprisingly, Bampton arrives at a different conclusion than Lois Gibson.

“It took me a little longer than expected to look into Lois Gibson’s authentication material due to the number of problems with it. From the material that I could find, I could not identify any effective analysis process.”

 

Mark Bampton
Mark Bampton of Ampthill, England

Unlike the artist Lois Gibson who claims to have authenticated Mills tintype by employing imagined photo comparisons and artistry, Bampton is not an artist. Bampton’s field is industrial design and product engineering, a profession that Bampton says requires both “artistic and technical demands.”

Instead of artistry, Bampton applied the sciences of mathematics, linear technical analysis, and measurement testing. These are the same skills Bampton employs as a product engineer. They also are the skills that a trained scientific forensic scientist normally would apply in the formal analysis of an historical image or artifact.

“I could not identify any logical or justifiable reason why Lois Gibson would authenticate the tintype…”

 Bampton soon discovered the Bob Ford/Jesse James controversy was not the only controversy involving the Houston-based artist. Lois Gibson also created a very similar controversy over an image she claimed was the famed bluesman, Robert Johnson. On the website Academia, Mark Bampton discovered that England’s newspaper The Guardian  had reported on the Jonhson controversy in an article titled, “‘Robert Johnson’ photo does not show the blues legend, music experts say.”

 

Robert Johnson image controversy
Disputed image of famed bluesman Robert Johnson

Dr. Bruce Conforth, a university professor of American culture and a founding curator of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, was cited in The Guardian article as criticizing Lois Gibson’s authentication technique.  “Historical scholarship relies on evidence,” Dr. Conforth said. “And if you look at the alleged authentication of that photograph there really wasn’t a piece of evidence, there was opinion. Historical fact is never validated by opinion; it can only be validated by evidence.”

Bampton soon discovered the reason why Lois Gibson would authenticate the claimed Bob Ford/Jesse James tintype.  when he read another article written by Dr. Bruce Conforth, that also was published on Academia. In writing “A New Analysis of the Two Accepted Photos of Robert Johnson and the Alleged 3rd Photo,” Dr. Conforth lays out the story of the Johnson image, its discovery, and Gibson’s record of association with it. This article followed two previous publications by Conforth. “Another Robert Johnson Photo Debunked” documents Conforth’s disgruntlement with the fakery surrounding the Johnson image. “The Business of Robert Johnson Fakery” is another Conforth article published in Living Blues magazine.

To Mark Bampton, the Conforth’s story already was  a familiar one. Dr. Conforth’s story of the Johnson image reflected almost precisely the sad saga of the Bob Ford/Jesse James image as related in the James family’s rebuttal to Gibson’s authentication.

Linear forensics applied to claimed Robert Johnson image
Linear forensics applied to Lois Gibson claimed image of Robert Johnson

Very familiar to Mark Bampton was the linear forensics applied to the Johnson image, that appeared in Dr. Conforth’s treatise.

Bampton decided to apply his own forensic skills upon the assumptive Bob Ford/Jesse James image.

 “I intended to make my report factual and impartial although conclusions about the veracity of the authentication were largely inevitable.”

Linear forensics applied to authentic image of Jesse James with a claimed image
Linear forensics applied by Mark Bampton to Lois Gibson’s alleged authentication of the claimed Jesse James image yields numerous discrepancies that are plainly visible.

Using several applications of linear forensics, now fully and clearly outlined in Mark Bampton’s documented report,  discrepancies proved to be multiple and evident. Not only were discrepancies revealed in the conjectural Jesse James image, they also became evident in Gibson’s uncertain Bob Ford image.

Linear forensics applied to authentic image of Bob Ford with a claimed image
Linear forensics applied by Mark Bampton to Lois Gibson’s alleged authentication of the claimed Bob Ford image yields plainly visible discrepancies.

“If this is correct, $40,250.00 is a lot to pay for a picture of two unknowns, even if it is an old tintype! Personally, I’d move the decimal place at least three places to the left.”

Mark Bampton registered shock when told by the James family that Sandy Mills’ tintype had sold at auction for $35,000, plus auction fees. The James family was informed of the sale by two regular attendees at Burley Auction Gallery events. The regulars stated that the prize bidder was not recognizable and was unknown locally.

The James family alleges that the fraud that is evident in Gibson’s hypothetical authentication may extend to the auction, too. Prior to the auction, Stray Leaves publisher, and Jesse James family biographer Eric F. James was contacted by the Houston Chronicle to schedule an interview following the auction. Given the very surprising outcome of the auction, this result should have made a gigantic news story, attracting worldwide attention. No historical image of Jesse James or the James family has ever sold for more than two thousand dollars. Eric F. James is perplexed that the Houston Chronicle did not follow through and interview him afterward as planned. Nor did the newspaper report on the auction outcome as it had planned. This was even more perplexing given the fact that Dylan Baddour of the Chronicle had broken the story initially about the pretentious tintype. Baddour previously also reported on Gibson’s alleged authentication of the Robert Johnson image.

icollector bid report
Sale report for the fake Bob Fork/Jesse James tintype is identified on icollector website

Not willing to accept one piece of oral testimony about the auction result alone, Mark Bampton uncovered secondary evidence of the auction’s outcome on icollector.com.

Of course, no evidence remains that the purchase money actually was paid, the image transferred, and the sale concluded. Nor has the winning bidder been publicly identified following the acquisition of such a prized auction artifact. Those unknowns in itself guarantees that this story will continue to be a controversy for a long time to come.

Initially, Mark Bampton titled his paper in true British fashion, using a very witty pun. He posed the question,  “Who are these four?”

The literal answer to the pun is a fake Bob Ford, a fake Jesse James, and two authentic images of them.  The non-literal answer is, whoever has benefited the most financially or in publicity from the promotion and sale. Among Lois Gibson, Sandy Mills, the auction house, and the Gibson-Mills ring of partners and supporters, a lot of unknown information remains. Ample room for conjecture is left. The wealth of criticism leveled at this controversy will not abate soon, at least not until the pun of the question finds authenticatable answers.

“I plan to do a separate paper for each of the two Robert Johnson photographs…I plan to follow a similar analysis for the Robert Johnson papers as for the Jesse James paper.”

Georgetown College
Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky

This fall, Mark Bampton will visit America to present his paper on “Jesse James, Bob Ford, and the Tintype” before the James family, their friends, and associates at the annual conference of the National James-Younger Gang Inc. The conference will be held in Georgetown, Kentucky. The public is welcome to attend.

MEET Mark Bampton:  SIGN UP for notices to attend & meet Mark Bampton at the James-Younger Gang 2017 Conference.

FREE DOWNLOAD: Mark Bampton’s entire paper now appears on the Academia website and also is free for download HERE.

CONTACT Mark Bampton

James-Younger Gang Past President Deceased

Janet H. Goodman, a longtime member and past president of the James-Younger Gang, died suddenly on June 30, 2013 at her home in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Janet was 73 at the time of her death.

Jan H. Goodman
Jan Goodman, days before her passing

Jan was a native of Minneapolis and was preceded in death by her parents, Julius and Lucile Nielsen, brother, Julius Jr. and close friend Jack Koblas. She is survived by her three children, Bret, Troy (Annette) Goodman, and Holly (Lannie) Segebarth. Also by three grandchildren, Avery, Davis and Vaughn, and a sister, Joan Nims. Memorial services were held Monday, July 7 at the Washburn-McReavy Funeral Home.

Janet worked for thirty years at the Fairview University Hospital in the accounts receivable department. She was also active in a number of fundraising activities at the hospital. She retired in 2006. She developed an interest in the James-Younger Gang when she went to a book signing by Jesse James book author Jack Koblas. Janet and Jack were high school classmates and she soon became Jack’s publicist. Jack suffered from Parkinson’s disease for the last decade of his life and Janet often drove him to his book signings. Speaking engagements, and other activities connected with his writing. She also often assisted in getting him to medical appointments and with other aspects of his medical care.

Jan H. Goodman and author John Koblas
Jan Goodman with author John Koblas

Janet became one of the movers and shakers in the James-Younger Gang organization. She was a lady who always knew how to get things done. From 2006 to 2010 she served as the secretary and treasurer, and from 2012 to 2013 was president of the organization. Janet was a selfless and caring person , she will be sadly missed by family and many, many friends.

Jesse James Family Wins Distinguished Milton F. Perry Award

An epic history of the family of Frank & Jesse James has garnered the esteemed Milton F. Perry Award.* The James-Younger Gang Conference of 2013 conferred the prestigious award upon author Eric F. James. His book, Jesse James Soul Liberty, is the first of five volumes the author is writing about the family stigmatized by their outlaws. The author’s acceptance, below, paid tribute to the James family, whom the author says defines what it means to be American in their actions, character, and soul. The James family alone, says the author, reveals why Jesse James endures as a cultural America icon.

Milton F. Perry Award

I thank the James-Younger Gang for this award. For a long time, I was aware this award is given only to those who make some ground- breaking contribution to the historical record. That makes this award special, and one well worth having. Especially gratifying to me are my friends and colleagues who advanced the candidacy of my book. I thank them, too.

When first publishing my research and genealogy findings for public review on our website Stray Leaves, starting in 1997, I fully expected assassins to come out gunning for me. Indeed, they did. Over ten years, mostly blank pot shots were fired, principally by claimants, charlatans, and detractors with no foothold in the facts. But there were others, too, who also came forth. They were more firmly grounded in factual history and evidence collecting. They offered contributions of their own, making the data, even more, bullet proof. I thank those contributors, also.

Curiously, I thought I would have received this award years ago when the ground-breaking genealogy for this book first was made known. When I last addressed you in Northfield, Minnesota in 2005, though, I was made keenly aware that not everyone wants to deal with the hardcore, dry data, which irrefutable genealogy provides.  I will never forget the words of Rex McBeath. Before me and all of you, Rex took dead aim at me and said, “Old Eric there, he’s only interested in who begot who. I’m interested in who be-shot who.” I recognized then that the new history my genealogy research possessed would have to find its audience in some other way.  So, this narrative history was begun. Then, one book turned into two books, and quickly into three, and now into four books. For the history book now, and the three yet to come, thank you, Rex McBeath.

Judge James Randall Ross
Judge James R. Ross

I next want to thank Jesse’s great grandson, the late Judge James R. Ross. Jim followed my study intently and avidly. He was always prompting me for the “evidence.” Little did I expect that after I had presented him an abundance of it, Judge Ross would hand me a 10-year sentence. “Why don’t you write a book about our family,” Jim asked. “Everyone writes about Frank and Jesse. No one ever writes about the family.” Meeting the James family, it was quickly clear. The James family had lost its history and its identity. One family line could not recognize another. I thank Jim and his wife Rosemary, and their next generation of Jesse James’ great grandchildren, for all of their continuing support.

This award deserves to be shared with the Jesse James family itself. After 130 years of self-imposed silence and self-inflicted anonymity, they finally broke their silence to recapture their lost identity and to reunite themselves in this effort. By offering me their documents, personally written memoirs, letters, and photos, and by making themselves available for long and intensive interviews, the Jesse James family now self-defines who they are, and what the James family is all about. As no historian can, the James family alone presents us the personality, character, and soul that they genetically share with the two disreputable family members who stigmatized and imprisoned them for so long.

Barbara James
Barbara James

Individually, I’d like to thank Barbara James, daughter of Daniel Lewis James, the Hollywood screenwriter, blacklisted as a Communist by the House on Un-American Activities Committee of the U. S. Congress. When Dan wrote his award-winning book Famous All Over Town, using his assumed pen name of Danny Santiago, Dan James was exposed and additionally brown-listed by the Hispanic literati. Thanks to Barbara’s first-hand testimony, the chapter in my book about Dan James was commissioned to be made into the play produced by Chicago’s Tony-winning Steppenwolf Theater. The award-winning Hispanic playwright Carlos Murillo has written the play and production is pending. Ironically Carlos lives on the same street, two blocks away from where I grew up. Carlos and I share a common belief that some divine hand has directed our works.

Joan Beamis
Joan Malley Beamis

Among other descendants of Drury Woodson James, I additionally thank J. Mark Beamis for making me custodian of his mother’s research records. The writings of Joan Beamis show clearly she knew there were much more James family genealogy and history to be known than what she had published in Background of a Bandit. Illness and death overcame Joan’s attempt to write a biographical history of the James family. I’m privileged and grateful to pick up what Joan left uncompleted.

Rev. James B. Malley S.J.
Fr. James B. Malley S.J.

Thanks, too, to Joan’s brother, Father James Burns Malley, a Jesuit priest in Boston. Father Jim provided his biography, showing how those among the James, who intentionally performed good works still became the targets of the government, social persecution, and ostracism – just like their notorious cousins. Like Father Jim, Judge Ross also was made a pariah. When Jim handed down the first judicial decision in America to help gay rights, Judge Ross was driven from his bench by masked political forces. The first purpose of Frank and Jesse to defend people’s rights continues today. For Father Malley and Judge Ross, we all should be grateful.

The many others whom I thank, you will find in the “Acknowledgements” chapter of my book. I’m sorry I could not be with you tonight. When informed of this award ceremony, I already had pre-scheduled commitments. I thank Charlie Broomfield for standing in.

Charles Broomfield
Charles Broomfield, Director, Clay County (MO) Parks & Recreation

In closing, many among the James family denied me access, as they did before with Joan Beamis. Joan wrote, “I was specifically warned not to try any correspondence at all with any relatives in Missouri.” I was told more strictly, “to mind my business.” Hopefully now, your approval and the imprimatur of your award upon this new history, will serve as a standing invitation to those among the James family, still dis-joined. It’s never too late to hold a family reunion. Without any doubt, there is more Jesse James family history to come.

More than my book, it is the James family who defines Jesse James’ soul liberty. More than my book, it is their stories, their deeds, and their history that represent in no uncertain terms what it means to be American. The James family alone elucidates why Jesse James endures as a cultural America icon.

My thanks to them, and my thanks to you.

Milton F. Perry & President Harry Truman
Milton F. Perry with President Harry S. Truman

 

* The Perry Award is named after Milton F. Perry, the founder and curator of the Harry S. Truman Library.

Perry also founded and was the first curator of James Farm & Museum in Kearney, Missouri.

 

Book Review – Jesse James Soul Liberty, Vol. I

In its book review of Jesse James Soul Liberty, appearing in the James-Younger Gang Journal, March 2013, reviewer Nancy B. Samuelson offers considerable praise for the book. Below is her review in its entirety, or DOWNLOAD THE REVIEW.

James-Younger Gang Journal mastheadBook Review: Jesse James Soul Liberty Vol. 1: Behind the Family Wall of Stigma & Silence, By Eric F. James (Cashel Cadence House 2012) 411 pp. hard cover, $36.95

Most longtime outlaw-lawman aficionados have probably read a number of books about Jesse and Frank James. Those books probably included Background of a Bandit by Joan M. Beamis and William E. Pullen and Jesse and Frank James: The Family History by Phillip W. Steele. Chances are you think you know a lot about the family of America’s most famous bandits. However, if you think this– think again– you have seen only the tip of the iceberg. Jesse James fanatics are going to be delighted with all the new material and serious historians are going to wonder how they have missed so much for so long.

The author points out that there is a paradox for the family of Jesse James. America celebrates the outlaws yet has stigmatized the outlaw’s family. This has led to a wall of silence within the family. The author goes on to say that the James family lived lives that are ordinary and the abundance of their accomplishments is more than enough to mitigate any stigma. In fact, the achievements of this James family are very impressive. Members of this family have built churches, schools, businesses and communities. They have achieved high professional standards and they have frequently taken a stand for religious, social and personal tolerance.

Book cover Jesse James Soul LibertyEarly members of the James Family in America left Virginia to avoid religious persecution. In Kentucky they founded churches and helped build communities. Members of the family moved on to Missouri, California, Texas and a number of other states.

Drury Woodson James went to California. He was active in local civic activities and in California politics. Among his descendants were Joan Beamis who battled deaf- ness and helped improve education for the deaf. She also researched family history and compiled extensive family archives. Another descendant of Drury Woodson James was Rev. James Burns Malley. He graduated from Dartmouth, served in the U. S. Navy then graduated from Harvard Law School. Later he became a Jesuit Priest and worked among the poor in Brazil for six years.

Thomas Martin James settled in the Kansas City, Missouri area and he became a very wealthy business- man. He assisted in founding some churches in the area. His descendants continued to contribute to the educational and business life of the Kansas City community. Vassie James was named for Vassar College. Her mother graduated from the first class of that school. Vassie also attended Vassar. She went on to found two schools in Kansas City. She also managed extensive financial holdings and was an early supporter of what became Planned Parenthood. Her second husband served as the President of the University of Missouri.

Another descendant of Thomas Martin James was Daniel Lewis James Jr. He graduated from Yale University, helped organize labor unions in Oklahoma then went to California and became a well-known writer. He worked with Charlie Chaplin on the script of The Great Dictator. He wrote the plays Bloomer Girl and Winter Soldiers. Bloomer Girl played on Broadway for eighteen months. Daniel Lewis James ran afoul of the House of Un-American Activities Committee. He was blacklisted and suffered a severe professional set back as a result of this.

There is considerable material in this book about Jesse Edward James, the son of Jesse James, and his family. There is also a chapter devoted to Judge James R. Ross. Many of us in the outlaw-lawmen community were acquainted with Judge Ross. However, few of us have known about his stand for civil rights for gays. Judge Ross made the ruling that Disneyland was violating the civil rights of a gay couple when they were expelled from the park for dancing together.

There are a few tidbits of new information in the book about Frank James. There is some mention of the Dalton gang. One member of the James family settled in Coffeyville, Kansas and his son was in one of the banks when the Daltons attempted their dual bank robbery. There is a family story or two about Belle Starr. There is Burton Allen James the Indian Agent and Missouri legislator. There is also John James of Alvarado, Texas who ran a school for Choctaw Indians and numerous other interesting members of the extended James family.

In addition to the individual stories of a number of the James family the book is liberally illustrated with family photos, pictures of family homes and buildings, copies of book jackets, playbills, and items from family art collections. There is an appendix that contains a detailed genealogy chart. There are extensive notes and a bibliography. The book is very well written, has an outstanding dust jacket and is
very pleasing in overall presentation.

There are a few editorial glitches such as the mix up of a couple of names and confusion of relationships between some of the family members. These are very minor and do not detract from the overall content of the book.

In summary, this is one of the best books I have read in a long time. I did not want to put the book down. It reads a lot like the family sagas written by Howard Fast and John Jakes. However, this is all fact, not fiction. If you have any interest in the James gang and their history this book is a “must read”. And do not skip the notes; there is a wealth of material to be found in the notes and the bibliography is a gold mine. Four more volumes of James family history are to follow this book. I eagerly anticipate all of them.

~ Nancy B. Samuelson