Tag Archives: Virginia

Indiana Cousins of Zerelda Elizabeth Cole-James

John B. Cropper
John B. Cropper 1825-1916, great-grandson of Richard James Cole & Anne Huabbard+
Candace Hollingsworth
Candace Hollingsworth-Cropper 1830-1910

A new line Cole family cousins have been found in Indiana. Before Lucy Cole of Woodford County, Kentucky married Jonathan Sebastian Cropper, the Cropper family’s ancestry reached back to 1685 and the birth of Ebenezer Cropper in Snow Hill, Worcester County, Maryland. After Lucy Cole Cropper died, Sebastian Cropper married Provey Dorsey of New Castle, in Henry County, KY.

Sebastian & Lucy Cole Cropper’s son, Joseph Yates Cropper born in Woodford County, married Rebecca Pollard of Shelby County. Their family lived briefly in Shelby County before moving northward to Augusta in Marion County, Indiana, John B. Cropper was born and married Candace Elizabeth Hollingsworth

The daughter of John B. and Elizabeth Hollingsworth Cropper is Goldie Edith Cropper. Goldie married William Owens of Bedford, Indiana. Their family moved to Indianapolis.

Goldie E. Cropper
Goldie Edith Cropper-Owens 1889-1965
Matthew Cleveland Cropper, Brother of Goldie Edith Cropper
Willard Owens 1922-1979

Their son, Willard Owens, served in World War II and returned home to work for General Motors until his retirement. His work for GM led him to become a painter in his retirement for the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Donald Robert Owens & Kathy McHaffey

 

Willard’s son is Donald Robert Owens. Donald’s wife, Kathy McHaffy, who has documented her husband’s genealogy which links him to the Cole ancestry of Frank & Jesse James.

 

 

 

 

PEDIGREE OF DONALD ROBERT OWENS

Donald Robert Owens & Kathy McHaffy

. Willard Owens & Virginia Elizabeth Hankins

.. William Owens & Goldie Edith Cropper

… William B. Cropper & Eliza Ward

…. John B. Cropper & Candace Hollingsworth

….. Joseph Yates Cropper & Rebecca Pollard

…… Jonathan Sebastian Cropper Jr. & Lucy Cole

……. Richard James Cole Sr. & Ann Hubbard

…… Richard James Cole Jr. & Ann Yates

….. James Cole & Sarah Lindsay

…. Zerelda Elizabeth Cole & Robert Sallee James

… Jesse Woodson James / Alexander Franklin James

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Ayme James Curlee Pointer – Wonderwoman of the James Family

The James and their descendants certainly can confound expectation. Some say the James are hard to figure out. Others say you don’t know what to expect of the James. Take this James family relation, for example.

AYME JAMES CURLEE-POINTER likes to do different things…like flying over the Virginia countryside.

Oh yeah…forgot to mention it…Ayme likes to fly in a Search & Rescue helicopter.

Sometimes, Ayme thinks it takes a woman to fill a man’s shoes. And she certainly does.

While everyone else in her family was celebrating Thanksgiving in 2011, Ayme was in fire school, because…

Ayme know she can get ‘er done!

That’s our James family cousin, AYME JAMES CURLEE-POINTER, who volunteers for the Virginia Airborne Search & Rescue. And that’s just one of the many things Ayme does.

 

Ayme Pointer’s James Pedigree

Ayme James Curlee-Pointer

. Dan Curlee & Brenda James

.. Jesse Franklin James & Ruth Opal Wells

… Jackson Waite James & Maggie Dozier Fitzgerald

…. John James of Alvarado & Mary Elizabeth Rosaline Bradley

….. Cyrenius Waite James & Amanda Jane Hall

…… Joseph Martin James & Rhoda May

……. John M. James & Clara Nall

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Edmond Thompson James Serves the Confederacy

Edmond Thompson James
Edmond Thompson James, 1835-1920

The Civil War had begun to surround the old Virginia home that James Carter James once occupied at Plainview in Fauquier County before he died in 1842. His progeny occupied the place since.

Avoiding the war for the James family was impossible. On April 15, 1861, President Abraham Lincoln ordered 75,000 troops, authorizing the Union to launch an aggressive attack upon the Confederacy.

A series of assaults throughout January and February of 1862 culminated on February 25th in the capture of Nashville, the first Confederate capital to fall to the Union. Eight days later, Carter James youngest son, George Carter James, enlisted at age twenty in the army of the Confederate States of America. He joined Company A of the 9th Virginia Cavalry. His regiment was called Stafford’s Rangers.

George Carter James 1842-1890, brother of Sgt. Edmond Thompson James
George Carter James 1842-1890, brother of Sgt. Edmond Thompson James

In July of the previous year, the U. S. House of Representatives passed the Crittenden Resolution, declaring that the war’s objective was not to interfere with slavery. The resolution required the Union take no action against the South’s “peculiar institution.” The bill’s sponsor, John Jordan Crittenden of Frankfort, Kentucky wrote, the war’s objective was to “defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union.”

Two weeks later, Congress passed the First Confiscation Act which emancipated slaves who served the Union during the war. In August, Gen. John C. Fremont ordered the emancipation of slaves in Missouri though Lincoln requested Fremont alter his decree. The following month, black troops were recruited in Kansas. By December, the Secretary of War issued a report authorizing the use of former slaves by the Army. At the same time, bills were introduced to abolish slavery.

The day after George Carter James enlisted, Abraham Lincoln requested Congress to pass a joint resolution urging for compensated emancipation. On March 10, 1862, President Lincoln met with Border State congressmen about the matter.

George Carter James compared with his cousin Jesse Woodson James
George Carter James compared with his cousin Jesse Woodson James

That very day on March 10th, two older brothers of George Carter James enlisted in Stafford’s Rangers, together with their brother-in-law. Edmond Thompson James joined with his brother John W. James. With them enlisted Richard Mortimer Crittenden, the husband of their sister Lucy Ann. Another sister, Sarah, married William T. Crittenden Jr.

Edmond Thompson and John W. James served Quarter Master duty. By December, Edmond was made a Sargent. After serving little more than a year, John W. James died on March 23, 1863, of an “inflammation of the bowels.” Edmond was severely ill the same month, but survived. Shortly afterward, Crittenden was assigned to detached service as a wagon master, a role he fulfilled through the end of the war, when he was paroled on April 15, 1865.

Through their service, Edmond was absent in March and again April of 1864. In July, as Confederate General Jubal Early got within five miles of Washington D. C. but was repelled, and again in August as Sherman began his march on Atlanta, Edmond was absent again. In this time, his brother George had gone AWOL. Edmond may have been sent to return George to duty. Both returned in August. On February 5, 1865, George was paroled, as Sherman scorched Georgia and South Carolina, and Jefferson Davis sued for peace. As Richmond fell, Edmond was paroled on April 18th together with George Mortimer Crittenden.

They all returned to Plainview to rebuild their lives in Fauquier County. George Carter James lived to 1890. Roger Mortimer Crittenden died in 1894. Edmond Thompson James lived well into the 20th century, dying in 1920 in his 85th year. John W. James gave his life to the war and to the Confederacy while on duty with Stafford’s Rangers.

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STAFFORD’S RANGERS

The Ninth Virginia Cavalry – Company A
Stafford Rangers – Stafford County

JAMES, EDMOND THOMPSON: Enl. 3/10/62 in Co. A. Promoted to Sgt., 12/1/62. Absent sick, Dec. 1862. Absent on QM duty, March-April and July-Aug. 1864. Present at 10/6/64 final roll. Paroled at Blacks and Whites, 4/18/65.

JAMES, GEORGE C.: Enl. 3/5/62 in Co. A. AWOL, Nov.-Dec. 1863 and July-Aug. 1864. Present at 10/6/64 final roll. Reported to the Bureau of Conscription on 2/5/65 as being AWOL in Fauquier Co.

JAMES, JOHN W.: Enl. 3/10/62 in Co. A. On extra QM duty, Sept. 1862 thru Feb. 1863. Died of “Inflamation of the bowels,” 3/21/63.

CRITTENDEN, RICHARD MORTIMER: b. 9/30/1825. Enl. 3/10/62 in Co. A. On detached service as wagon master, March 1863 thru Aug. 1864. Present at 10/6/64 final roll. Paroled in Va., 4/15/65. d. 4/2/1894 in Stafford Co. bur. Grove Church, Fauquier Co.
(ed. Brother-in-law, spouse of Lucy James.

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PEDIGREE

John W. James 1824-1863                                                                              Edmond Thompson James 1835-1920                                                                 George Carter James 1842-1890
. James Carter James & Martha Lee Tiller
.. Capt. Joseph James & Clarissa Brown
… George James Sr. & Mary Wheeler
…. Thomas James & Sarah E. Mason
….. John James, the Immigrant & Unknown

Historians Visit Cole Cemetery & 2nd Great-Grandparents of Frank & Jesse James

Tombstones of Richard James Cole (1729-1814) & Ann Hubbard-Cole (1720-1795), his wife.

In 1754 at the age of 24, John Cole signed a lease with Hancock Lee for 150 acres of land on the north side of Horsepen Run. The land adjoined the plantation of John Herndon in King George County, Virginia.

Cole’s Bad Tavern, circa 1866. Photo courtesy of former resident, Frieda Curtis Wheatley

In 1775 and 1776, Lee’s son Willis Lee entered Virginia’s District of Kentucky and encamped at the spring named Lee’s Big Spring, midway between today’s Frankfort and Lexington. Willis Lee, his cousin Hancock Taylor, Isaac Hite, James Douglas, and John Floyd surveyed the area, for the Ohio Company. They filed 18 surveys, totaling 7,200 acres. Taylor built a log cabin but then was killed by an Indian war party. In April of 1776, Willis Lee also was killed.

Cole’s Bad Tavern cookhouse with Cole’s Cemetery on the hill in the distance.

Capt. John Lee, son of Hancock Lee of Virginia, entered Kentucky and made a brick addition to Taylor’s log cabin. He occupied the structure and began a tavern business. The Kentucky Gazette advertised Lee’s Blackhorse Inn.

Russ Hatter, Assistant Curator of the Capital City Museum, Frankfort, Kentucky

John Cole died three years after executing his lease. His funeral expenses were paid with a case of whisky. In 1782, John’s youngest son, Richard James Cole, joined John Lee in Kentucky, building a residence on Cole’s Road, connecting Lexington to Frankfort. With Humphrey Marshall, Cole surveyed Frankfort for a new state capitol. He soon acquired slaves. On Cole’s Road, Richard James Cole established and operated Cole’s Tavern. The notoriety of the place nicknamed the business as Cole’s Bad Tavern.

In 1802 John Cole died. His ordinary, not too distant from Cole’s Bad Tavern, was sold to the mulatto William Dailey and his partner John Kennedy. Fortesqieu Cummings wrote his stays at the Blackhorse Inn and Cole’s Bad Tavern.

Any traveler who has once contrasted the rough vulgarity and the badness of his table and accommodations, with the taste, order, plenty and good attendance of his (Cole’s) mulatto competitor will never trouble Mr. Cole a second time.”

Eric F. James at Cole Cemetery, Midway, Kentucky
Genealogist and Jesse James family historian Eric F. James, author of Jesse James Soul Liberty.

In 1811, Cole’s Bad Tavern burned. In December of 1812, Richard James Cole acquired the nearby Blackhorse Inn from Dailey & Kennedy. Richard James Cole Jr. became its operator. Richard Sr. died three years later. His great-granddaughter Zerelda Elizabeth Cole was born in the Inn on January 29, 1825. Zerelda’s sons are Frank & Jesse James.

LINKS: More about Cole’s Bad Tavern

More about the Blackhorse Tavern

FREE DOWNLOAD:  The Descendants of John Cole Sr. – the Immigrant