Tag Archives: William

Indiana Cousins of Zerelda Elizabeth Cole-James

John B. Cropper
John B. Cropper 1825-1916, great-grandson of Richard James Cole & Anne Huabbard+
Candace Hollingsworth
Candace Hollingsworth-Cropper 1830-1910

A new line Cole family cousins have been found in Indiana. Before Lucy Cole of Woodford County, Kentucky married Jonathan Sebastian Cropper, the Cropper family’s ancestry reached back to 1685 and the birth of Ebenezer Cropper in Snow Hill, Worcester County, Maryland. After Lucy Cole Cropper died, Sebastian Cropper married Provey Dorsey of New Castle, in Henry County, KY.

Sebastian & Lucy Cole Cropper’s son, Joseph Yates Cropper born in Woodford County, married Rebecca Pollard of Shelby County. Their family lived briefly in Shelby County before moving northward to Augusta in Marion County, Indiana, John B. Cropper was born and married Candace Elizabeth Hollingsworth

The daughter of John B. and Elizabeth Hollingsworth Cropper is Goldie Edith Cropper. Goldie married William Owens of Bedford, Indiana. Their family moved to Indianapolis.

Goldie E. Cropper
Goldie Edith Cropper-Owens 1889-1965
Matthew Cleveland Cropper, Brother of Goldie Edith Cropper
Willard Owens 1922-1979

Their son, Willard Owens, served in World War II and returned home to work for General Motors until his retirement. His work for GM led him to become a painter in his retirement for the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Donald Robert Owens & Kathy McHaffey

 

Willard’s son is Donald Robert Owens. Donald’s wife, Kathy McHaffy, who has documented her husband’s genealogy which links him to the Cole ancestry of Frank & Jesse James.

 

 

 

 

PEDIGREE OF DONALD ROBERT OWENS

Donald Robert Owens & Kathy McHaffy

. Willard Owens & Virginia Elizabeth Hankins

.. William Owens & Goldie Edith Cropper

… William B. Cropper & Eliza Ward

…. John B. Cropper & Candace Hollingsworth

….. Joseph Yates Cropper & Rebecca Pollard

…… Jonathan Sebastian Cropper Jr. & Lucy Cole

……. Richard James Cole Sr. & Ann Hubbard

…… Richard James Cole Jr. & Ann Yates

….. James Cole & Sarah Lindsay

…. Zerelda Elizabeth Cole & Robert Sallee James

… Jesse Woodson James / Alexander Franklin James

RELATED STORIES

Cole Descendant – Thomas Jesse Cole of Landers, Wyoming

Cole Descendant – Film Star Gloria Stuart

Cole Descendent Ermina Jett Darnell

Cole Family Historical Sites

GREAT-GRANDSON OF JESSE JAMES & DANIEL BOONE, DONALD JAMES BAUMEL, IS DEAD

“If all I did was to walk around saying that I’m a descendant of Daniel Boone and a descendant of Jesse James, I wouldn’t have a life of my own.”
– Donald James Baumel to Eric F. James, 2002

Donald James Baumel, James Gang & Family Reunion, 2002, Paso Robles, California

The ancestry which Donald James Baumel inherited from America’s iconic outlaw Jesse James and Kentucky’s iconic explorer Daniel Boone determined how Don lived and died. Central to his life was what Don valued most – his privacy.

Don Baumel died on April 27, 2011. Family members delayed announcement of his death, considering whether to announce it at all. If Don had his way, he would have probably preferred to slip away into history totally unnoticed, with no recognition either of his life or of his death by anyone.

Don was last seen among his family at the James Gang & Family Reunion, held in Paso Robles, California in 2002. Months of coaxing by Judge James Randall Ross, Don’s first cousin, finally got Don to show up. Among 200 family and friends attending the reunion, Don went virtually unnoticed among them as he circulated freely through all the events. No one had seen Don in years. He talked with few people.

At a break in the events, Judge Ross and I went to lunch with Don. He ordered a sandwich, but picked at it sparingly. We then went shopping for a western outfit, so Don could be dressed western style like the rest of us. But in every store, Don resisted. Nothing was purchased. That night at the banquet, however, Don appeared in a western outfit that had more worn authenticity than anyone else in the dining room. He looked like he just had stepped out of the California West when Frank and Jesse last visited Paso Robles. The clothes were Don’s own.

Touring historic sites the next afternoon, Don rode with me, my niece Kathryn Craft, and Steve Leonard of the James Preservation Trust. For once, Don was not silent at all. We showered him in questions. Don not only responded generously, he gave us an exclusive insight into his life, which no one ever had heard before.

Don was born a twin. His twin sister Diane survives him. In high school in Los Angeles, Don and Diane both were considered “joiners.” If a group existed, they joined. Years later in 2007, I met Barbara Clemens from their high school class. Barbara confirmed the fact. Diane and Don were elected by their classmates, together with three others, as “Ephebians,” the top graduation honor awarded to those who demonstrated the highest grade averages, and who were the most socially and politically active. Don was Vice-President of the student body.

About this time, Don learned he was a direct descendant of the notorious outlaw Jesse James. Like most others among the James family who stumbled upon the family secret, Don was advised not to advertise the fact, but not to deny it either, if questioned. Don chose to avoid the question altogether.

When he joined the U. S. Army, Don’s life began to change. He was assigned to a security group, and stationed at a radio squadron in Mobile, Alabama. Don learned tools of the secrecy trade. Exiting the Army, Don enrolled at UCLA in California. He no longer was the socially and politically active student that he once was in high school. Don had changed.

Don knew little of his family history, unlike his cousin Jim Ross, who had grown up in the household of Jesse James Jr. For himself, Don seemed to live in a growing fear of the past. As he did, Don’s life appeared to become directionless. When his father Mervyn Baumel died in 1964, Don was left a trust fund instead of an outright inheritance. Unlike his cousins descended from Thomas Martin James, the Kansas City millionaire merchant, Don didn’t need to worry about having money or a career, and the possible exposure that came with it

Most of his life, Don lived in San Francisco. Like a couple of his less recognized cousins, Rev. William Henry James who maintained a mission for the poor and homeless of Kansas City, and Luther Tillman James who founded the Kansas City Provident Association to financially support programs for the poor and homeless, Don developed an affinity for the disenfranchised of San Francisco. Among the faceless of Market Street, Don found he could live and work as he pleased, both comfortably and anonymously. Money meant little, if nothing, to Don. Anything he had, he was happy to share or give away. Like Rev. William Henry James, like his ancestral Mimms cousins, and like his third great grand Uncle Drury Woodson James, Don lived in a hotel.

A heart attack took the life of Donald James Baumel, as it did his cousin Jim Ross in March of 2007, and also Jim’s mother Jo Frances James in March of 1964.

ERIC JAMES
Danville, Ky.
September 28, 2011

*********************************

DON’S DESCENT FROM JESSE WOODSON JAMES
Jesse Woodson James & Zerelda Amanda Mimms
. Jesse Edward James Jr. & Estella Frances McGowan
.. Mervyn Baumel & Jessie Estell James
… Donald James Baumel

DON’S DESCENT FROM DANIEL BOONE
Daniel Boone & Rebecca Ann Bryant
. Nathan Boone & Olive Van Biber
.. Alfred M. Hosman & Mary Boone
… Luther Alfred McGowan & Mary Frances Hosman
…. Alfred Monte McGowan & Martha Ann Wood
….. Jesse Edward James Jr. & Estella Frances McGowan
…… Mervyn Baumel & Jessie Estell James

…… Donald James Baumel

RELATED STORIES

High School Photos of Jesse James Great-Grandchildren

Russell William Adams Has Died

Russell William Adams, born Sept. 4, 1943, went home to our heavenly father Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. His passing from his earthly home to heaven was at 6:32 a.m. at the University of Kentucky Hospital. This was after a very long illness.

He was born in Eubank to the late James Finley and Anna West Adams of Eubank. He was a dedicated Christian man, a loving husband and very devoted father. He was a kind and likable man with a wonderful outlook on life. His one last wish was that those who have not yet been saved and come to know the Lord would do so. A special scripture from the King James Bible states in Isaiah 55, verse 12, “For ye shall go out with joy, and be led forward with peace: the mountains and the hills shall break forth before you into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.” He was loved by all and will be sadly missed by those that had the privilege of personally knowing him. He proudly served the United States in the 3rd Recon, 4th Cavalry unit, attached to the 25th Tropic Lightning Infantry division of the United States Army.

He retired as the director of security on July 31, 2000, from the Kentucky State Psychiatric Center (K.C.P.C.) in Lagrange, Ky., after 33 years of service with the department of corrections and the department of human resources.

He is survived by his loving and devoted wife of 32 years, Roberta Auxier Adams; two sons, William Benjamin Adams of Seattle, Wash., and Russell Andrew Adams of Science Hill, Ky.; and three daughters, Deann (and Brian) Davis of Seattle, Wash., and Melissa (and Jeff) Spears and Susan Mofield–Loveless-Shadoan (and David) Colyer, both of Science Hill, Ky. He is survived by a brother-in-law, Benjamin Harrison (and Debbie) Auxier of Fountain Green, Utah; a brother-in-law, George Auxier of Stanford, Ky.; a mother-in-law, Margaret Edmonds Auxier of Stanford, Ky.; a very special uncle and aunt, John and Marianne (Auxier) Kirby of Danville, Ky.; and his siblings: Mary Gilland of Cincinnati, Ohio, Allene Fetter of Goshen, Ohio, Brenda Adams of Frankfort, Ky., Oscar Adams of Burnside, Ky., and Leslie Adams and his girlfriend Rhonda Stevens of Woodstock, Ky.; eight grandchildren: Ariel and Brandon Davis of Seattle, Wash., Rhubin and Curtis Spears, Amanda and Andrew Adams, Tyler Loveless and Sidney Shadoan of Science Hill, Ky., in addition to many special nieces, nephews, and great nieces and nephews; and a sister-in-law, Kathleen Adams of Woodstock, Ky.

He was preceded in death by seven brothers: Carl, James (Jamup), Edison (Honey), Elbert, Hartford, Norman and Lester; one sister Joyace Rose; his father-in-law Benjamin Harrison Auxier of Danville, Ky.; and sister-in-laws Ruth Adams and Lucille Adams.

His memorial service will be Sunday, Sept. 11, at 9:30 a.m. in the sanctuary at the Mintonville United Methodist Church in Mintonville, Ky. Pastor David Green will be performing the service.

Somerset Undertaking & Crematory is in charge of arrangements.

Condolences can be expressed to the Adams family at: www.somersetundertaking.com.

PEDIGREE

Russell William Adams
. James Finley Adams & Anna West
.. Andrew Jackson Adams & Nancy Ann Shadowen
… John James Shadowen & Lucinda Asker
…. Samuel Chaudoin Sr. & Sarah James
….. Rev. Joseph Martin James & Martha McAlister

The Man Who Dug the Grave for Jesse James’ Twins

At 94, Darrell L. Cave is still connected to the family of Frank and Jesse James. As was his 4th great grandfather, Rev. William Cave, back in the 18th Century.

Uncle Billy Cave, as he was called then, was exiled from Colonial Virginia as a rebel preacher. Among other rebel preachers who were known to “shove a text of scripture down your throat,” Uncle Billy entered Kentucky in a Traveling Church, together with Jesse and Frank’s grandfather, John M. James. When the Cave and James families moved on to Missouri, Uncle Billy’s grandson Uriah Cave donated land in Kearney to establish the Mt. Olivet Church.

In 2004, Darrell Cave personally dug the final resting place in Mt. Olivet’s cemetery for Jesse’s twin children, Gould and Montgomery James. Laying the twins to rest beside their parents was Jesse’s great grandson, Judge James R. Ross. Assisting the Judge was Eric James of the James Preservation Trust, who had exhumed the twins’ remains in Waverly, Tennessee, and brought them to Missouri.

In his eulogy over the twins’ grave, Judge Ross recognized the fulfillment of a promise he had made to Jesse’s son. “Today, we reunite Gould and Montgomery James with their parents. We know they are with their parents in heaven. In bringing them here, I am fulfilling a promise I made 50 years ago to their son, Jesse Jr. I am glad to have fulfilled this promise. May God grant them eternal rest.”

From the start, the re-internment of Jesse’s twins had been fraught with numerous difficulties. Darrell Cave, who had been a long time sextant of Mt. Olivet Cemetery, had his own issues about the event. Darrell was mindful of the circus atmosphere that previously surrounded the exhumation of Jesse James in his cemetery in 1995. He was not about to let another circus happen again. The hurdles Darrell Cave set up required persuasion.

As cemetery sextant, Darrell first denied the re-internment altogether. Following numerous conversations with Judge Ross, Darrell was persuaded to finally allow the wishes of Jesse’s wife Zee for reunion with her children to be fulfilled.

But Darrell had his caveats. No press would be permitted. Agreement came readily. Then Darrell insisted no cameras be present. Eric James laughed, reminding Darrell of the famous picture of Frank James standing before the gates of James Farm where a posted sign read, “No Kodaks!” Eric argued there had to be a documentary record, since historical personages were involved and the event itself was historic by nature. Darrell relented. Then Darrell insisted only one person could be in attendance. Eric and the Judge rebutted, stating the event required at least one principal and one witness. Before they provided the legal argument for why, Darrell agreed. Darrell only would allow Judge Ross and Eric James to attend.

On the day of re-internment, Eric James met Darrell Cave in person for the first time. Eric was struck by something he could only define as spiritual.

Recalling his arrival for the dis-internment of Jesse’s twins in Tennessee, Eric met the grave diggers in Waverly for the first time. One introduced himself as Robert Shadowen. Immediately Eric asked Robert for the name of his grandfather. When Robert told him, Eric said, “You’re kin to the James.” Robert denied it. Using his laptop, Eric showed Robert how Robert’s ancestral French Chaudoin family, sometimes pronounced Shadowen in America, was linked to the Mimms family, and through the Mimms to their James cousins.

In Kearney, when Darrell Cave introduced himself, his Cave surname struck a similar chord with Eric. Then Eric inquired of Darrell, “Cave family of colonial Virginia?”

Darrell responded, “Yep.”

Eric pressed, “Came into Kentucky with the Traveling Church?”

Again, Darrell responded “Yep.”

Eric pressed further, “Are you descended from Uriah Cave?”

Darrel answered, “He’s my second great grandfather.”

Eric explained his excitement to Darrel Cave. Eric pointed additionally to the fact that the dis-internment in Tennessee was assisted by Ann Yager Hamlin, a descendant in the Samuels family who also are related to the James through the outlaws’ stepfather Reuben Samuels. Hamlin represented Humphreys County as its official court witness to the exhumation. Ann Yeager Hamlin, Robert Shadowen, and now Darrell Cave had not been assembled through any conscious preplanning. Such an outcome could only be defined in the context of a  spiritual event. Clearly, hands from on high were also assisting.

Back in Kentucky, Eric went to the files of The James Preservation Trust. Eric had been working on a donated archive from Mike Albright, a James relative of the Cole family from Nebraska. Eric sent a picture from the file to Darrell Cave of some Cole family children in Nebraska. A boy at the left the end of the picture was identified as “Darrell Cave.” Eric inquired of Darrell if he knew the identity of the boy Darrell Cave in the photo. Darrell responded, saying “That’s me.” Darrell then explained that, following harvest time, the Cave family usually traveled and visited with cousins. In this case, Darrell was visiting his Cole family cousins in Nebraska, who also are cousins of the James.

In 2010, the Kearney Chamber of Commerce recognized Darrel Cave and his family for their contributions to the City of Kearney.

Photo by Matt Frye, Kearney Courier

RELATED STORIES:

 

The Reunion of Gould & Montgomery James, a slide show.