J. Mark Beamis Endorses Jesse James Soul Liberty

ENDORSEMENT by J. MARK BEAMIS…Mark is the son of Joan Beamis who authored the first genealogy of the Jesse James family Background of a Bandit, first published by the Kentucky Historical Society in 1970, and replicated by others since. He and his mother are first cousins of Frank & Jesse James. Mark has just written the following, highly personal endorsement. The files Mark references are his mother’s original research files for her book. The opening chapter of Jesse James Soul Liberty addresses Joan’s first attempts to learn of her own relationship to the outlaws Frank & Jesse James, after her father let the cat out of the bag through a slip of the tongue.

“I first learned of Eric James and his literary endeavors in late 2002, early 2003. My uncle told me about him, as Eric had contacted him while doing research on his book, Jesse James Soul Liberty. He referred him to me as my mother had compiled over many years of research a voluminous amount of material concerning the ‘famous’ outlaw Jesse James and his connection to our family.

“As my mother had passed away several years earlier, I was carting around these boxes with really no clue as to what was in them. To make a long story short, I sent him over 40 lbs. of documents in the Spring of 2003. Thanks to his detailed knowledge of the subject matter, and his expert skills as a writer and researcher, I’ve learned more about my mother’s work and my family than I ever dreamed possible.

“Reading preliminary drafts of his chapters on my mother and her work has moved me to tears, and I have had no qualms about donating all of her research and source material to him for safekeeping. He’s a very interesting and talented man, and I endorse him without reservation.”

J. Mark Beamis, October 9, 2012

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JESSE & FRANK JAMES GET A NEW 3RD COUSIN, 5 TIMES REMOVED. I dedicated Jesse James Soul Liberty to my uncle Richard Donald "Dick" James. This morning, Mar 2, 2021, shortly after 7 am, a great-grandson was born to Uncle Dick. Liam Robert Struckmeyer was born to Dick's son Matt & Taylor Lynn Goulbourn Struckmeyer. And I get a new 1st cousin. ... See MoreSee Less

JESSE & FRANK JAMES GET A NEW 3RD COUSIN, 5 TIMES REMOVED. I dedicated Jesse James Soul Liberty to my uncle Richard Donald Dick James. This morning, Mar 2, 2021, shortly after 7 am, a great-grandson was born to Uncle Dick. Liam Robert Struckmeyer was born to Dicks son Matt & Taylor Lynn Goulbourn Struckmeyer. And I get a new 1st cousin.Image attachment

Theater advertisements for plays appeared like this in newspapers. This ad for Bloomer Girl appeared in August of 1845. Bloomer Girl was the product of Daniel Lewis James Jr. and principally his wife Lilith Stanward. The following excerpt about them appears in JJSL:

Written against the backdrop of World War II, when blacks were moving out of the South into an industrial workforce, and women also were moving out of the home into the workplace, Bloomer Girl is set in the pre-Civil War era, interweaving themes of black and female equality, war and peace, and politics. The play’s principal character, Dolly, is based upon the inventor of the bloomer, Amelia Bloomer, a contemporary of an acquaintance of Vassie James and Susan B. Anthony. As a fighter in the suffragette movement for women’s rights, Bloomer advocated, “Get rid of those heavy hoop skirts; wear bloomers like men; let’s get pants; let’s be their equal.” In the play, Dolly politicks for gender equality, as her rebellious niece Evelina politicks her suitor, a Southern slaveholding aristocrat, for racial equality. As the play’s librettist, Yip Harburg, stated,
Bloomer Girl was about “the indivisibility of human freedom.”

Bloomer Girl opened on Broadway on October 5, 1944. Dan (Daniel Lewis James) insisted Lilith’s (Dan’s wife) name come first in the show’s credits. The play was an instant hit, lasting 654 performances. Dan remained modest about the show’s success, considering his contribution a failure. “...I seem not to have given full credit to my collaborators on the 1944 musical comedy Bloomer Girl...The facts, in brief, are as follows: the originator of the story idea from which the musical grew was my wife, Lilith James, who charmingly chose the perversities of Fashion to dramatize the early struggles of the Women's Rights movement. She also developed the principal characters. I joined her in writing a first draft of the libretto. It failed to satisfy our lyricist, E. Y. Harburg, and Harold Arlen, the composer. It also failed to satisfy us. An impasse developed at which point all agreed to call in the team of Sig Herzig and Fred Saidy who were experienced writers in the field of musical comedy. They reworked the material to the satisfaction of everyone but Lilith and myself, who had hoped to invade Gilbert & Sullivan territory, with what we thought was a light-hearted paradoxical look at history. What I took for a personal artistic failure for which I blamed, first of all, myself, went on to become a lavish entertainment which played on Broadway for eighteen months and has since often been revived in summer theater. If I was not delighted, audiences certainly were and full credit for this should be given to Sig Herzig and Fred Saidy (now deceased) without whom the production would never have taken place...”
... See MoreSee Less

Theater advertisements for plays appeared like this in newspapers. This ad for Bloomer Girl appeared in August of 1845. Bloomer Girl was the product of Daniel Lewis James Jr. and principally his wife Lilith Stanward.  The following excerpt about them appears in JJSL:Written against the backdrop of World War II, when blacks were moving out of the South into an industrial workforce, and women also were moving out of the home into the workplace, Bloomer Girl is set in the pre-Civil War era, interweaving themes of black and female equality, war and peace, and politics. The play’s principal character, Dolly, is based upon the inventor of the bloomer, Amelia Bloomer, a contemporary of an acquaintance of Vassie James and Susan B. Anthony. As a fighter in the suffragette movement for women’s rights, Bloomer advocated, “Get rid of those heavy hoop skirts; wear bloomers like men; let’s get pants; let’s be their equal.” In the play, Dolly politicks for gender equality, as her rebellious niece Evelina politicks her suitor, a Southern slaveholding aristocrat, for racial equality. As the play’s librettist, Yip Harburg, stated,
Bloomer Girl was about “the indivisibility of human freedom.”Bloomer Girl opened on Broadway on October 5, 1944. Dan (Daniel Lewis James) insisted Lilith’s (Dan’s wife) name come first in the show’s credits. The play was an instant hit, lasting 654 performances. Dan remained modest about the show’s success, considering his contribution a failure. “...I seem not to have given full credit to my collaborators on the 1944 musical comedy Bloomer Girl...The facts, in brief, are as follows: the originator of the story idea from which the musical grew was my wife, Lilith James, who charmingly chose the perversities of Fashion to dramatize the early struggles of the Womens Rights movement. She also developed the principal characters. I joined her in writing a first draft of the libretto. It failed to satisfy our lyricist, E. Y. Harburg, and Harold Arlen, the composer. It also failed to satisfy us. An impasse developed at which point all agreed to call in the team of Sig Herzig and Fred Saidy who were experienced writers in the field of musical comedy. They reworked the material to the satisfaction of everyone but Lilith and myself, who had hoped to invade Gilbert & Sullivan territory, with what we thought was a light-hearted paradoxical look at history. What I took for a personal artistic failure for which I blamed, first of all, myself, went on to become a lavish entertainment which played on Broadway for eighteen months and has since often been revived in summer theater. If I was not delighted, audiences certainly were and full credit for this should be given to Sig Herzig and Fred Saidy (now deceased) without whom the production would never have taken place...”

Moulton J. Green has died at the age of 93 from Covid19. Moult is the husband of Jean McGreevy, the second great-granddaughter of Thomas Martin "T.M." James. Jean appears on pages 221-222 of JJSL. Read Moult's obituary here: legacy.com/us/obituaries/kansascity/name/moulton-green-obituary?n=moulton-green&pid=197474427 ... See MoreSee Less

Moulton J. Green has died at the age of 93 from Covid19. Moult is the husband of Jean McGreevy, the second great-granddaughter of Thomas Martin T.M. James. Jean appears on pages 221-222 of JJSL. Read Moults obituary here: legacy.com/us/obituaries/kansascity/name/moulton-green-obituary?n=moulton-green&pid=197474427

EXCERPT from Jesse James Soul Liberty, Volume I, “All for the Underdog”. . .

Daniel Lewis James Sr. was educated as a “business aesthete, who painted.” He preferred being addressed simply as “D.L.” Thelma Duncan Barr, the wife of Jesse James grandson Laurence Barr, wrote that she met D.L. once, but didn’t like him. He appeared “too aloof” for her country taste. Even inside his own family, D.L. was regarded somewhat as a snob. But D.L. James was not without dash. He was a Kansas City tennis champion. He took on Bill Tilden, the world’s number one tennis player for seven years. D.L. could do a no-hands flip, and he often dressed in white tie and tails.

D.L.’s granddaughter, Barbara James, recalled him from her childhood. “D.L. and [his wife] Lillie visited us in Hollywood, staying at the Garden of Allah which was diagonally across Havenhurst St. from our house. I was playing on the steps of the hotel’s famous kidney-shaped pool. For some reason, I decided to walk to the bottom of the steps, which was over my head, and proceeded to drown. D.L. was coming out of their room to go to dinner as I disappeared. Without hesitation, he jumped into the deep end of the pool, struggled to the shallow end, and pulled me out. He was in full white tie and tails, and he couldn’t swim.”
... See MoreSee Less

EXCERPT from Jesse James Soul Liberty, Volume I, “All for the Underdog”. . .Daniel Lewis James Sr. was educated as a “business aesthete, who painted.” He preferred being addressed simply as “D.L.” Thelma Duncan Barr, the wife of Jesse James grandson Laurence Barr, wrote that she met D.L. once, but didn’t like him. He appeared “too aloof” for her country taste. Even inside his own family, D.L. was regarded somewhat as a snob. But D.L. James was not without dash. He was a Kansas City tennis champion. He took on Bill Tilden, the world’s number one tennis player for seven years. D.L. could do a no-hands flip, and he often dressed in white tie and tails.D.L.’s granddaughter, Barbara James, recalled him from her childhood. “D.L. and [his wife] Lillie visited us in Hollywood, staying at the Garden of Allah which was diagonally across Havenhurst St. from our house. I was playing on the steps of the hotel’s famous kidney-shaped pool. For some reason, I decided to walk to the bottom of the steps, which was over my head, and proceeded to drown. D.L. was coming out of their room to go to dinner as I disappeared. Without hesitation, he jumped into the deep end of the pool, struggled to the shallow end, and pulled me out. He was in full white tie and tails, and he couldn’t swim.”

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Hello how do I buy this book? I am from the James/Prouty line. I sent a message through the website as well. Thank you.

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