Frank James – Scholar with a Gun

From Phil Stewart’s Archive, first published on Stray Leaves in 1999. 

Frank James – Scholar with a Gun

By Phil Stewart

Frank James received more education as a young man than did most rural Missouri farm boys of the 1850s and 60s. The James farm was just a mile from Somersette school. Frank attended regularly…almost enthusiastically…until he was eighteen years old.

Frank James
Frank James

In addition to “The Three Rs,” Frank developed a love for classic literature. He would sit for hours with the works of Shakespeare and other famous writers of the time. His father, the Rev. Robert Sallee James, had been a scholarly man himself. Frank had his father’s collection of books readily available. Frank’s love for literature would remain with him throughout the dark years of the Civil War, and even through the outlaw years to come.

Many researchers believe that Frank James desired to further his education by attending William Jewell College in nearby Liberty. There is no doubt Frank had the intellectual capacity. His acceptance into the college was a given. His father had been a major influence in the founding of the school, and had been a member of the first Board of Trustees. Any such plans were dashed, though, with the coming of the Civil War. Frank James was 18 years old in 1861, and like most young men, left home to serve “the cause.”

Henry IV
Henry IV, Tomb Effigy, Canterbury Cathedral

The blood, death, and brutality of the border war could not extinguish the love Frank James had for reading, knowledge, and for classic works of literature. They became his passion. It is difficult to imagine one member of Quantrill’s Raiders sitting around a campfire reading anything, let alone reading English literature like Frank.

If Frank desired to further his education, the circumstance had changed. Like most schools of the area, William Jewell College closed shortly after the opening shots of the war. The college would not reopen for nearly three years. Frank still had his father’s library. Shakespeare had become his favorite works. He read and reread the plays until he could snap out a quote for almost any situation. During the war, Frank and been tabbed with the nickname “Buck.” “Professor” might have been more appropriate afterward.

If more education was out of the question, Frank certainly could put Shakespeare to work on behalf of the James Gang…which is exactly what he did at Gad’s Hill, Missouri. Frank James lifted the script of Shakespeare’s HENRY IV for a train robbery, during which Frank performed Shakespeare for a captive audience.

Henry IV-Pt 1

ANALYSIS by Drew Fracher

So, what about this play?

Although called HENRY IV, I believe that this is the story and journey of his son Hal, the Prince of Wales, who will go on to become Henry V.

Here we have a young man who knows in his heart that he will inherit a huge job…and who is trying his best to have some fun before the fact. I realize that much of what Hal I doing is not avoiding responsibility, but trying to learn as much as possible about the job to come. Trying to experience the society that he will eventually be in charge of from all levels, figuring out what fairness and justice are all about, who you can trust and what realis is important in his own world. A journey all of us must go through.

Hal clings to his life and friends in the tavern as substitutes for the things that are lacking in his relationship with his father. Hal and his dad are having trouble communicating. We witness Hal’s coming of age, his growth to manhood and an acceptance of huge responsibility, all the steps on his rocky road.

The good news is that he not only survives, but flourishes. There are no true villains or heroes here, only different sorts of people trying their best to figure out how to make it in the world. That is perhaps what I like best, that no one is clearly in the right and politics is politics, then and now.

DREW FRACHER,  Director, Georgia Shakespeare Festival, 1999

*************

COMMENTARY by Eric F. James

As a former actor myself, I perceive Frank James as Prince Hal…an eldest son, a carefree and boisterous youth, distinguished in war, a “wild prince” given to audacity and rebellion.

Henry IV expelled and banished his son, Hal. Did Frank James spiritually experience a similar disapproval by his deceased father?

Frank James was 27 years old at the time of the Gad’s Hill train robbery. His performance from HENRY IV in the middle of the robbery intentionally may have been foreshadowing his expected retirement.

_______________________________________________________________________________

RELATED:   More from Phil Stewart’s 1999 Archive

The Plot to Capture Jesse James

The Plot to Assassinate Jesse James

The Gad’s Hill Train Robbery

School Time for Jesse James – Part I

School Time for Jesse James – Part II

Jesse James & Half-Brother Perry Samuel

Jesse James Family – Slaves & Servants

Robert Sallee James – Father of Jesse James

Jesse James Myths & Facts

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Friday August 21st, 2020

Stray Leaves

WHY STRAY LEAVES NEVER WILL RUN OUT OF STORIES...The ancestry of many people in SL's genealogy database can be traced back to 99 generations. Some, even more. Imagine the bounty of stories yet to be discovered, yet to be told. ... See MoreSee Less

WHY STRAY LEAVES NEVER WILL RUN OUT OF STORIES...The ancestry of many people in SLs genealogy database can be traced back to 99 generations. Some, even more. Imagine the bounty of stories yet to be discovered, yet to be told.

Tuesday August 18th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Covid 19 testing is underway at Vassie James' Pembroke Hill School! ... See MoreSee Less

Thursday August 13th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Color restoration to images originally created in black and white is a current fashion in genealogy circles. Oddly, the current rage is not producing the brouhaha that arose decades ago when Ted Turner purchased MGM Studios and began a program of colorizing old black and white movies. The most outrage surfaced when Turner colorized the film Gone with the Wind. Historians argued that colorization was a violation of artistic intent.
Today, artistic intent is not a consideration when it comes to old family photos, although the argument certainly would apply to such art images as those made by famed Yosemite photographer Ansel Adams. If anything, colorization appears to increase the authenticity of a family photo, as shown in the image below of the family of Nicholas Knaff & Theresa Tholl, taken as their son Aloysius departs for World War I. The richness of post-Edwardian color produces a vivacity in the image that was not evident or even present in the original and same black and white image.
For the James descendants of Anna Emalen Knaff, standing at the right end of the second row, the dimension of color restores the warmth she was known to possess and project.
... See MoreSee Less

Color restoration to images originally created in black and white is a current fashion in genealogy circles. Oddly, the current rage is not producing the brouhaha that arose decades ago when Ted Turner purchased MGM Studios and began a program of colorizing old black and white movies. The most outrage surfaced when Turner colorized the film Gone with the Wind. Historians argued that colorization was a violation of artistic intent. 
Today, artistic intent is not a consideration when it comes to old family photos, although the argument certainly would apply to such art images as those made by famed Yosemite photographer Ansel Adams. If anything, colorization appears to increase the authenticity of a family photo, as shown in the image below of the family of Nicholas Knaff & Theresa Tholl, taken as their son Aloysius departs for World War I. The richness of post-Edwardian color produces a vivacity in the image that was not evident or even present in the original and same black and white image. 
For the James descendants of Anna Emalen Knaff, standing at the right end of the second row, the dimension of color restores the warmth she was known to possess and project.

Wednesday August 12th, 2020

Stray Leaves

J. Mark Beamis makes his 14th triple platelets donation of 2020. Mark is a great-grandson of Drury Woodson James & son of Joan Malley Beamis, author of Background of a Bandit.

Platelets are cells that help blood clot and support the immune system. During a platelet donation, you give up to six times the amount of platelets contained in a whole blood donation, and your fluids, plasma, and red cells are returned to your body. Not only do platelet donors provide more of the life-saving platelets patients need, they also help limit how many donors a patient is exposed to.

Donated platelets have a shelf-life of 5 days. Platelet donors are constantly needed, especially on weekends and during holidays, to keep the supply stable.

Blood types most needed: A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-
... See MoreSee Less

J. Mark Beamis makes his 14th triple platelets donation of 2020. Mark is a great-grandson of Drury Woodson James & son of Joan Malley Beamis, author of Background of a Bandit.

Platelets are cells that help blood clot and support the immune system. During a platelet donation, you give up to six times the amount of platelets contained in a whole blood donation, and your fluids, plasma, and red cells are returned to your body. Not only do platelet donors provide more of the life-saving platelets patients need, they also help limit how many donors a patient is exposed to.

Donated platelets have a shelf-life of 5 days. Platelet donors are constantly needed, especially on weekends and during holidays, to keep the supply stable. 

Blood types most needed: A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-
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