Tag Archives: Coffeyville

Possum & Joseph McJames

With so much to be sad and concerned about, Joseph McJames was not about to end his day unpleasantly. Writing to his daughter Mary Ellen, he could not wait to tell her about his possum.

The letter Mack received from Mary Ellen was filled with disappointment. There was the illness of Mack’s wife, too, that concerned everyone. Mack still had his house keeper Clary to rely on. At the age of 82, soon to be 83, this “fine Kentucky gentleman” as Mack was called was still in control. That discipline extended also to his possum.

Letter of Joseph McAlister James to his daughter Mary Ellen James-Saunders-Huestis

10 o’clock
Coffeyville, Oct. 2nd, 1901

Dear Ellen,

Have just read your letter. So sorry, so sorry for you and dear Maggie. And sorry Annie did not come. I feel sure they could have gotten a wise position. I could have gotten it for them.

Don’t be uneasy about your dear mother. If any difference, she is a little better than when you left. I am watching over her both day and night. Clary is here and won’t leave until you get back home. And if she does, I will find someone else.

Everything is going right. Don’t be uneasy. Bring Maggie with you.

I will see Mr. Hunt and will box up all in safe condition.

Send a postal often. Tell us of all things. Clary is all right.

Will have a fine possum for dinner. I caught (it) in her house stealing eggs.

Affectionately,
J. Mc. James


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Tuesday February 18th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Quantrill scout, John Noland, African-American...Our James cousin Ronnie Atnip shows us these photos of two Quantrill reunions. One features Frank James, front and center. The other features John Noland, top right. ... See MoreSee Less

Saturday February 15th, 2020

Stray Leaves

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other. Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.

The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwood's marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.
... See MoreSee Less

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other.  Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.
 
The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie  Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwoods marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.

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John and Dinah were my 7th.great grandparents.

Tuesday February 4th, 2020

Stray Leaves

One hundred years ago, tourists still visited the Black Horse Inn at Nugent Corners in Midway, Ky. where Frank & Jesse James' mother was born. ... See MoreSee Less

One hundred years ago, tourists still visited the Black Horse Inn at Nugent Corners in Midway, Ky. where Frank & Jesse James mother was born.
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