Tag Archives: Frankfort Heritage Press

Dr. Samuel Evans James Building, Frankfort, Ky.

This week, when fact-checking a chapter from the epic new history being written about the James family where Dr. Samuel Evans James and John E. Miles both appear, Russell Hatter offered us this photo from the archives of his Frankfort Heritage Press. The image of the building owned by Dr. James in Frankfort, Kentucky in which Miles operated a flour store formerly was donated by Steve Moore and has never been made public before.

Samuel E James building in Frankfort KY

To the left of the John E. Miles, Flour Store is a plaque that says, “Dr. S. E. James, Entrance Upstairs. “

This building stood on St. Clair St., in Frankfort opposite the Franklin County Courthouse. As Dr. James conducted his medical practice, across the street his father, the eminent jurist Judge Andrew Jackson “A. J.” James practiced law as a lawyer, Commonwealth Attorney General, and judge. This building was torn down about 1900.

John E. Miles was distantly related to James through his wife, Annie Hawkins. The James, Hawkins, & Miles descendants share many common ancestors in colonial Virginia, among the Dabney, Strother, Keith, Willis, Thornton, & Randolph families.

Frankfort residence of Dr. Samuel E James

Dr. James and his wife, Sallie Jouett Taylor, made their home at 418-420 Anne St. in Frankfort, seen here today with its separate business entrance on the far corner of the home.

Sallie was born at 210 St. Clair St., a short distance from the upstairs office of Dr. James.

The Taylor’s family’s residence was next to her father’s Farmer’s Bank, where A.J. James also had served as the bank president.

Frankfort Residence of A. J. James

The residence of A.J. James stands at the corner of Main & Wilkinson Streets and is now occupied as lawyers’ offices.

For more about A. J. James, and Dr. Samuel E. James, click HERE.

The Frankfort Heritage Press maintains an excellent website, that also sells fine books about Frankfort’s early history.

Samuel Evans James building in the news

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Friday August 21st, 2020

Stray Leaves

WHY STRAY LEAVES NEVER WILL RUN OUT OF STORIES...The ancestry of many people in SL's genealogy database can be traced back to 99 generations. Some, even more. Imagine the bounty of stories yet to be discovered, yet to be told. ... See MoreSee Less

WHY STRAY LEAVES NEVER WILL RUN OUT OF STORIES...The ancestry of many people in SLs genealogy database can be traced back to 99 generations. Some, even more. Imagine the bounty of stories yet to be discovered, yet to be told.

Tuesday August 18th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Covid 19 testing is underway at Vassie James' Pembroke Hill School! ... See MoreSee Less

Thursday August 13th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Color restoration to images originally created in black and white is a current fashion in genealogy circles. Oddly, the current rage is not producing the brouhaha that arose decades ago when Ted Turner purchased MGM Studios and began a program of colorizing old black and white movies. The most outrage surfaced when Turner colorized the film Gone with the Wind. Historians argued that colorization was a violation of artistic intent.
Today, artistic intent is not a consideration when it comes to old family photos, although the argument certainly would apply to such art images as those made by famed Yosemite photographer Ansel Adams. If anything, colorization appears to increase the authenticity of a family photo, as shown in the image below of the family of Nicholas Knaff & Theresa Tholl, taken as their son Aloysius departs for World War I. The richness of post-Edwardian color produces a vivacity in the image that was not evident or even present in the original and same black and white image.
For the James descendants of Anna Emalen Knaff, standing at the right end of the second row, the dimension of color restores the warmth she was known to possess and project.
... See MoreSee Less

Color restoration to images originally created in black and white is a current fashion in genealogy circles. Oddly, the current rage is not producing the brouhaha that arose decades ago when Ted Turner purchased MGM Studios and began a program of colorizing old black and white movies. The most outrage surfaced when Turner colorized the film Gone with the Wind. Historians argued that colorization was a violation of artistic intent. 
Today, artistic intent is not a consideration when it comes to old family photos, although the argument certainly would apply to such art images as those made by famed Yosemite photographer Ansel Adams. If anything, colorization appears to increase the authenticity of a family photo, as shown in the image below of the family of Nicholas Knaff & Theresa Tholl, taken as their son Aloysius departs for World War I. The richness of post-Edwardian color produces a vivacity in the image that was not evident or even present in the original and same black and white image. 
For the James descendants of Anna Emalen Knaff, standing at the right end of the second row, the dimension of color restores the warmth she was known to possess and project.

Wednesday August 12th, 2020

Stray Leaves

J. Mark Beamis makes his 14th triple platelets donation of 2020. Mark is a great-grandson of Drury Woodson James & son of Joan Malley Beamis, author of Background of a Bandit.

Platelets are cells that help blood clot and support the immune system. During a platelet donation, you give up to six times the amount of platelets contained in a whole blood donation, and your fluids, plasma, and red cells are returned to your body. Not only do platelet donors provide more of the life-saving platelets patients need, they also help limit how many donors a patient is exposed to.

Donated platelets have a shelf-life of 5 days. Platelet donors are constantly needed, especially on weekends and during holidays, to keep the supply stable.

Blood types most needed: A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-
... See MoreSee Less

J. Mark Beamis makes his 14th triple platelets donation of 2020. Mark is a great-grandson of Drury Woodson James & son of Joan Malley Beamis, author of Background of a Bandit.

Platelets are cells that help blood clot and support the immune system. During a platelet donation, you give up to six times the amount of platelets contained in a whole blood donation, and your fluids, plasma, and red cells are returned to your body. Not only do platelet donors provide more of the life-saving platelets patients need, they also help limit how many donors a patient is exposed to.

Donated platelets have a shelf-life of 5 days. Platelet donors are constantly needed, especially on weekends and during holidays, to keep the supply stable. 

Blood types most needed: A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-
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