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John James of Alvarado & the Choctaw at Stockbridge Academy

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Stockbridge Academy, photo courtesy of Chuck Hudson, a third great grandson of Judge James Hudson

Between 1884 and 1888, John James of Alvarado, Texas, returned to the Choctaw Nation in Indian Territory from his home in Wise County, Texas. He came to Stockbridge Academy, found today at Eagletown, Eagle County, Oklahoma, to fulfill his dream of being with the Choctaw, a dream he held to since his first encounter with them on his family’s migration from Illinois into Texas Territory when he was fifteen.

John’s first wife, Mary Elizabeth Rosaline “Ross” Bradley, died in 1879, leaving him with four children.

Two months later, John quickly remarried to Louisa Ellen Sutton. By 1884, Louisa had given John two more children. But soon, John would find himself at Stockbridge surrounded by many more than his own six children.

John James (1852-1927), commonly referred to among his family as John James of Alvarado

Stockbridge was founded by Cyrus Byington, who named the Choctaw school after his birthplace in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

Byington migrated to Mississippi in 1821, where he became a missionary to the Choctaw. Finding the Choctaw had no written language, Byington set about to create a grammar, dictionary, and speller.

Byington followed the Choctaw in 1832 in their removal to Oklahoma. There, for another thirty-one years, Byington preached and taught among the Choctaw. Byington died in 1876.

Cyrus and Sophia Nye Byington, photo courtesy of Chuck Hudson

 

Judge James Hudson, photo courtesy of Chuck Hudson

John James was invited to Stockbridge by Judge James Hudson. John arrived sometime in 1884. At Stockbridge, John and Louisa would add two more children to their growing family. Among John’s students were the children and grandchildren of Judge James Hudson, some of whom found their way into John’s book My Experience with Indians, published in 1927 right before John died.

In 1888, John James acquired a portion of the estate of his former father-in-law Jackson Bunyan Bradley, who died the previous year. Bradley and his family came to Texas from Mississippi in 1851, accompanied by his brother-in-law Sam Myers. In Johnson County, Texas, Bradley built and operated a school at Mountainview, where John would live and teach next.

Elliston E. Dyer

Though John James left Stockbridge for Mountainview, he also retained his love of the Choctaw. When he wrote My Experience with Indians he wrote of them in particular “that my children and grandchildren may know of them.”

Six years later in 1894, after leaving Stockbridge, John James received a letter from one of his former Choctaw students, Elliston E. Dyer.

Hon. J. James, Alvarado, Texas.
“My dear old time friend:
“I have just received a copy of the Cleburne Daily Times, and in it I find your picture, and note that the paper states that you spent several years among the Choctaw Indians, as a missionary…This of course calls to my mind the days of long ago, when you were at old Stock Bridge, trying to guide to the right direction, the destinies of a bunch of more or less ignorant boys and girls…Of the Choctaw tribe, I am one, and I have often thought since then, what a pity that men like you weren’t scattered all over this country…”

On December 29, of that same year of 1894, Louisa bore John a son, the last of the couple’s thirteen children. John and Louisa James named the child Elliston Dyer James.

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My Choctaw Family, The Family History of Judge James Hudson

Genealogy Database for the Choctaw Relatives of John James of Alvarado

Preview Chapter Four, “An Independent Free Man,” from Jesse James Soul Liberty About John James of Alvarado

Susannah James, Matriarch of Colbert Chickasaw Descendants  


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Stray Leaves Daily

Stray Leaves Daily

Daily updates from the official website for the family & friends of Frank & Jesse James with stories, photos, & two searchable genealogy databases.

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2 weeks ago
Stray Leaves Daily

WELL, PULL MY TEETH! Dr. Timothy Michael Huckabee & staff wear Huckabee Dental’s own brand of dental scrubs in Southlake, TX. Dr. Tim is a 4th great-grandson of Rev. Joseph Martin James & Rhoda May, and a 3rd great-grandson of Cyrenius Wait James & Amanda Hall. That’s how his James genes from Pulaski Co KY took root in TX. Dr. Tim’s grandmother is Anna Ruth James-Wingo. With her degree in journalism, Anna later studied at Cambridge University in England. Back home, she was an officer in the Parent Teachers Association, a charter member of the Wills Point Historical Society, special correspondent to the Dallas Morning News, and was chosen Woman of the Year by the Rotary Anns in 1976. The Wills Point High School named the Wingo Library in honor of her and her husband David Stimson Wingo in 1998. Anna wrote books for her grandchildren and a legacy of memory stories for the James family titled “Roots and Wings”. Dr. Tim is also a 3rd cousin of Frank & Jesse James. When requesting services, be sure to ask him for "the outlaw discount." See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago
Stray Leaves Daily

JESSE JAMES & JIM YOUNGER? Stray Leaves responded to this submission, saying, "Following the recent 6-year fiasco of a tintype image and its claims, wanna-be images keep on coming our way, as you surmise. They add to the hundreds already on file with the James Preservation Trust. While you may see ‘a passing resemblance,’ our experience takes us way past any such consideration. However, old tintypes are always fun to see. Thank you. See MoreSee Less

JESSE JAMES & JIM YOUNGER? Stray Leaves responded to this submission, saying, Following the recent 6-year fiasco of a tintype image and its claims, wanna-be images keep on coming our way, as you surmise. They add to the hundreds already on file with the James Preservation Trust. While you may see a passing resemblance, our experience takes us way past any such consideration. However, old tintypes are always fun to see. Thank you.
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