Tag Archives: Knights of the Golden Circle

The Largest Knights of the Golden Circle Treasure Ever

BOOK REVIEW: Myers, Jack, Knight’s Gold: The Largest Documented KGC Treasure Ever Discovered (Jack O’Llantern Press, 2016) pp. iv +498, illustrations, endnotes, no bibliography or index, ISBN 9781539896562, soft cover $18.95

By Nancy B. Samuelson 

Like a lot of books about the Knights of the Golden Circle (KGC) and the tales about treasure that the KGC supposedly buried to finance a second Civil War, this work contains a lot of speculations, garbles a lot data, and contains a ton of misinformation. The book is tedious to read, everything the author says he repeats at least three times.

Knight’s Gold
Knight’s Gold: The Largest Documented KGC Treasure Ever Discovered by Jack Myers

A lot of the book deals with two treasure troves found in Baltimore, Maryland. Both of these troves are believed by the author to have been buried in basements by members of the KGC. Little factual data and a lot of questionable information is given to support this theory. We are asked to believe that two teenagers who found the first trove carried five thousand gold coins home in their pockets and shoes! A practice problem from the book, New Practical Arithmetic, published in Boston in 1875 is construed by the author to be a coded message by the agents of the Knights of the Golden Circle in Baltimore concerning the buried treasure.

Ray's New Practical Arithmatic
A coded treasure message published in 1875?

 

Another reported treasure trove is located within Victorio Peak in New Mexico. This area is now on the White Sands Test Range. A lot of various stories are related about this reported treasure trove. The odor of fraud permeates almost all of what is reported about this supposed treasure location.

The most bizarre “treasure” parts of the book deal with none other than America’s most famous bandit, Jesse Woodson James. 

The James boys did not spend their loot but socked it away to help fund the Knights of the Golden Circle and the second Civil War. No mention is made of all the race horses the James brothers bought, raced and bet on.

Almost all of the off the wall stuff published about Jesse James is trotted out in this book. Orvis Houk, Del Schrader, Ron Pastore, Henry J. Walker and a variety of other questionable James literature is quoted.(Somehow Betty Duke and her claim that her great-grandfather, James L. Courtney, was the real Jesse James got left out. This must have been an oversight.) This specious material is jumbled in with material from well written and well researched books. The author makes no effort to select the wheat from the chaff in any of this.

The James material is all a total tangle of out and out falsehoods, misinformation and speculation. One fiction novel even is cited to support some of this material.

Examples of some of this material are: (1) William Clark Quantrill was head of the KGC’s Knights of the Iron Hand; (2)John Newman Edwards wrote dime novels after the war; (3) After the war Jesse James worked as a bounty hunter and tried to go straight; (4) Gov. Crittenden appointed Sheriff James Timberlake as a deputy U. S. marshal (these are federal appointments); (5) Sheriff Timberlake went to New Mexico after he collected his reward and likely helped stash some of the Victorio Peak treasure;  (6) Albert Pike started the KKK:  etc. etc. etc. The nonsense boggles the imagination!

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Sunday February 23rd, 2020

Stray Leaves

Paul Maccabee explains why St. Paul MN was a safe haven for criminals like Francis Lawrence "Jimmy" Keating of our James family. Paul was drawn to SL by our profile of Jimmy you can find in the comments below. In the video, Paul shows a record of Jimmy's train robbing cohort Tommy Holden. ... See MoreSee Less

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Tuesday February 18th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Quantrill scout, John Noland, African-American...Our James cousin Ronnie Atnip shows us these photos of two Quantrill reunions. One features Frank James, front and center. The other features John Noland, top right. ... See MoreSee Less

Saturday February 15th, 2020

Stray Leaves

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other. Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.

The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwood's marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.
... See MoreSee Less

What did Benjamin Franklin Smallwood 1829-1901, Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation, see in these two women who look so much like one another? He married one and then later the other.  Annie Burney of the Chickasaw Nation on the left was Chief Smallwood’s first wife. Mary Abigail “Abbie” James of the Choctaw Nation on the right was his second wife.
 
The two wives succeeded the Chief’s liaison with Sinai LeFlore. Chief Smallwood was a LeFlore descendant himself. On his maternal side, he was a great-grandson of Jean-Baptist LeFleur, immigrant to Mobile in Spanish Territory, America from Versailles, France. His liaison with Sinai, which produced a son Daniel LeFlore in 1850, was in all likelihood incestuous.

Annie Burney married Chief LeFlore in 1849. The couple’s first child Lorinda “Sis” LeFlore was born on January 9th of that year. Four other children followed. Annie  Burney is a second great-granddaughter of Benjamin James, the lawyer and Indian trader, and son of Capt. John James and Dinah Allen. Lorinda LeFlore married Henry Clay James, who is a grandson of the Indian Trader Benjamin James.

The grandfather of Abbie James is the very same Benjamin James. This explains the remarkable likeness of the two women. Smallwoods marriages to the two women must have made for some curious repartee in the Smallwood household.

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John and Dinah were my 7th.great grandparents.

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