Tag Archives: Montana

Confederates in Montana Territory

BOOK REVIEW: Robison, Ken, Confederates in Montana Territory: In The Shadow of Price’s Army, (South Carolina: The History Press, 2014.) 190 pp., photos, illustrations, bibliography/notes, index. ISBN 978-1-62619-603-2, paperback, $19.99

By Nancy B. Samuelson

Confederates in Montana Terrirtory-Ken Robison
Confederates in Montana Territory: In the Shadow of Price’s Army by Ken Robison

I was eager to dig into this book as I am a long time student of Missourians in the Civil War. However, I was very disappointed in the book. It is an attractive book with a lot of good photos and illustrations, but the research is only skin deep.  The title of the book is misleading as only about four of the men discussed in the book served in Price’s Army. The author does not have a very good grasp on the history of Price’s Army and the guerrilla units associated with Price. The book contains several errors. In the forward to the book, 1859 is given as the year California entered the Union. The correct year is 1850. Colonel Thoroughman was said to have been taken to a prison in Quincy, Illinois after he was captured. There was no Union prison at Quincy, he most likely was taken to the prison at Alton, Illinois. The Moore brothers were said to have gone south into Kentucky and spend a night with John M. James, the grandfather of Jesse James. A good trick indeed, as John M. James died in 1827.

Confederates in Montana
An early tintype, owned by Ken Robison, showing unidentified Confederate soldiers in Montana Territory.

There are two stories in the book concerning supposed Quantrill men. The first story is about James Berry. This chapter is reasonably close to the facts; Berry did serve with Quantrill for a short time. He also did participate in a robbery with the Sam Bass gang and was killed when there was an attempt to apprehend him. The author states that Berry’s family survived to become prominent in Montana history, but leaves the reader completely in the dark about the family’s contribution to the state’s history.

Ken Robison, author
Author Ken Robison

The chapter about Langford “Farmer” Peel, is titled “When Truth Is Stranger Than Fiction”. A good title, since this tale is almost entirely fiction. Langford Peel never served with Quantrill or anybody else during the Civil War. He hung out in mining camps in California, Utah, Nevada and Montana during the time of the Civil War. He was a rough customer and was accused of several murders. He was finally shot and killed in Montana. The tale about some of Quantrill’s men hijacking a steamboat to come after Peel is from a newspaper article from the Great Falls Tribune of April 30, 1922. The story is complete fiction.

There were a number of men from Price’s Army who did go to Montana and who became prominent men. John C. C. “Coon” Thornton and Thomas L. Napton immediately come to mind, but the author ignored these men. Several Quantrill men are known to have gone to Montana too, one served as the Sheriff of Lewis and Clark County. These folks are also ignored. The book is an easy read but it is history light-weight.

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This book review is co-published with the James-Younger Gang Journal.

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Monday October 19th, 2020

Stray Leaves

NOT SURPRISING TO US. Jesse James is known to visit Talbott Tavern in Bardstown, Ky. Just when Jesse was there is unknown. Louis Bourbon, the 3rd Duke of Orleans who became the last king of France known as the Citizen King, also visited Talbott Tavern, as the story below by Sam Terry writes. Louis was traveling America while waiting for the French Revolution to remove Napoleon. Probably only known to the James family's community of Stray Leaves is the fact that Jesse and the Citizen King are 9th cousins, 6 times removed. The Leaf Blower of Stray Leaves is a 10th cousin of Louis, 8 times removed. ... See MoreSee Less

Monday October 12th, 2020

Stray Leaves

What it's like in the office of Stray Leaves. ... See MoreSee Less

What its like in the office of Stray Leaves.

Comment on Facebook

Oh my, that is a lot of files.

Amen lot of history there

Sunday October 11th, 2020

Stray Leaves

Haydon Calvert "Bud" Cooper passed last night in his 93rd year. Bud's kinship spanned many lines of the James family. He was a 6th cousin of Frank & Jesse James, as well as a 6th cousin of Frank's cohort Col. John Pendleton "Black Jack" Chinn. He also shared kinship with numerous James relatives.
Bud's ancestors arrived from England and Wales to the Virginia Colony in the early 1600s. They followed identical migration paths as our James from Virginia into the Kentucky frontier, then into the American heartland.
Bud's grandparents descended from the same Calvert & Dorsey families as Frank & Jesse, and the same Morgan family as Col. Chinn. They migrated from Harrodsburg, Ky. into the Far West. They settled in Utah and founded the town of Myton, where Bud was Myton's City Councilman, museum founder, docent, virtually all his life. His daughter Kathleen Cooper followed as Mayor of Myton in Bud's footsteps.
You can find videos of Bud at his Myton museum on YouTube. He loved telling history as much as being history.
... See MoreSee Less

Haydon Calvert Bud Cooper passed last night in his 93rd year. Buds kinship spanned many lines of the James family. He was a 6th cousin of Frank & Jesse James, as well as a 6th cousin of Franks cohort Col. John Pendleton Black Jack Chinn. He also shared kinship with numerous James relatives. 
Buds ancestors arrived from England and Wales to the Virginia Colony in the early 1600s. They followed identical migration paths as our James from Virginia into the Kentucky frontier, then into the American heartland.  
Buds grandparents descended from the same Calvert & Dorsey families as Frank & Jesse, and the same Morgan family as Col. Chinn. They migrated from Harrodsburg, Ky. into the Far West. They settled in Utah and founded the town of Myton, where Bud was Mytons City Councilman, museum founder, docent, virtually all his life. His daughter Kathleen Cooper followed as Mayor of Myton in Buds footsteps.
You can find videos of Bud at his Myton museum on YouTube. He loved telling history as much as being history.

Thursday September 24th, 2020

Stray Leaves

WELCOME NEWS. Regarding our recent genealogy discovery of our James family lines of Choctaw & Chickasaw lineage, now comes news that the Choctaw & Chickasaw Nations are now displayed on Google Maps.The Choctaw Nation's reservation boundaries are now mapped on Google Maps! This will make it easier for people to search and view our reservation boundaries with just a few clicks. Check out our reservation on Google Maps at the following link >> bit.ly/363xszw. ... See MoreSee Less

WELCOME NEWS. Regarding our recent genealogy discovery of our James family lines of Choctaw & Chickasaw lineage, now comes news that the Choctaw & Chickasaw Nations are now displayed on Google Maps.
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